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Full text of "PaC SaC 1930"

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Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2010 with funding from 

Lyrasis IVIembers and Sloan Foundation 



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THIS VOLUMK WAS DESIGNED, PHOTO- 
KNCRAVKD AM) PRINTED ALL IN THE PLANT 

OF 

JACOBS & COMPANY 

CLINTON, S. C. 



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¥\KT THORWLEY 

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R.S. CRAWrORD 



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Joth ANNIVERSARY 




YCLUME Wti 

Published b if— 
YHE SENIOR CL4SS 

riti:xiiY Ti:itiA\ 

CLINTON. S.C.''^**'*^ '■'*''' 



This Volume is dedicated, with 
cordial Esteem and Gratitude, 
to a Man of optimistic Vision, of 
comprehensive Outlook, of reso- 
lute Purpose, of invincible Cour- 
age, of ready Resourcefulness, of 
abiding Hope, of inspiring Faith 
in God and Men, of sympathetic 
Insight into adolescent Charac- 
ter and Aspirations, of unswer- 
ving Adherence to what is Right; 
— to whom else, then, but to him 
who during the two years of his 
Administration has done so 
much for Presbyterian College? 
No other than, 

Pres. John McSween, B.S., B. D. 



M 



DEDICAWIOW 





In this seventeenth volume of the PaC SaC we have attempted to 
portray the life and activity of the campus as at present, and to 
conuneniorate and perpetuate the history of the fifty years of 
Presbyterian College's existence. 

We hope that in years to come you may scan its pages and find it 
ever a source of fond recollections and pleas(uil memories. 





The College 

Athletics 

Organizations 



Sponsors 

Military 

Satire and Advertisements 



880 



youthful Ideals 

Old aims, old hopes, old jailhs that now are lost. 
Which once 1 thought so strong and firm of root. 
Were all too frail to thrive in Summer's heat. 
And Autumn s reapers found hut little fruit. 
W hile Winter's calm reflection bared the truth 
That each teas but the golden dream of youth. 

Neu- aims, new hopes, new faiths replace the old. 

They, too, mar wither on the sunny day; 

But if they briefly furnish me a mould, 

Wherein to shape life's youthful way: 

And then give way to thoughts which nobler seem, 

I shall not hold their north of small esteem. 

— B. Harris Dickson. 



1930 




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FIFTIETH ANNIVERSARY 

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Presbyterian College 



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Hkv. William Plumer Jacobs, D. 0.. LL. 1). 

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Facsimile of the Original Charter of Presbyterian College 



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PRESIDENTS OF 
PRESBYTEWAN COLLEGE 




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1888-90 




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PRESIDENTS or 
PRESBYTERIAN COLLEGE 




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Rev WC, NEVILLE, DDUD, 
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REV ROBERT ADAMS,D,D, 
1907- to 



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Acting PreMent 1910-11 1911-2^ 




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REV JOHN n«5W£EII,R5'Rft 
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Poge Twenty-seven 




Aliis. William James Bailkv 

NEE Floren'Ck Li:e Jacobs 
Member and Honor Gradunlf ol the first Graduating Class 



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Miss JESSIE LEE COPELa:.;; 
;;:.M;ss FLORENCE LEE JACOBS, 



Facslmile of the First Graduation Invitation 



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Page Tirenly-nine 



880 



"Relieve It Or ^t" 

By F. H. Thornley 

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{Itith apologies to Mb. Ripley) 

"The first commencement was held on the 5th July, 1883. An address was de- 
livered by Col. B. W. Ball of Laurensville and diplomas were delivered to the 
graduating class composed of three young ladies." 

"For the sum of one hundred dollars paid quarterly in advance, students will be 
received, boarded and educated in the College building under Prof. Lee"s immediate 
care and supervision." 

''Studv hours are strictly observed for those residing in the College building, 
under Prof. Lee's presence and supervision. Students residing elsewhere can obtain 
this advantage by application for it." 

"The morals of the village are the best. No liquor is sold within the limits of 
the town, a special law forbidding its sale within three miles of the Clinton Depot. 
There are no bar rooms or billard saloons." 

"Board can be had in any of the families of the village, at eight dollars per 
month. Washing can be had at the rate of fifty cents per month in advance." 

"Records of scholarship, deportment and absence are regularly kept, and re- 
ports of the same are sent to parents and guardians at the close of each month and 
oftener if desired or considered necessary." 

"The Summer ^ acation is from the first Friday in July to the first Monday in 
September." 

"In addition to the literary course, students can receive instruction in Vocal and 
Instrumental Music, and also in Drawing and Painting. These departments are under 
control of accomplished teachers. The price for each is three dollars per month. 
Use of the instrument, extra." 

"The girls will have a boarding house separate from the young men, and will 
be under the special care of a lady teacher." 

"We strictly prohibit card playing or other games of chance, intoxicating liquors 
and the carrying of concealed weapons. 

"Room rent may be had at the rate of ten dollars per session, in Alumni Hall, a 
dormitory now being erected. A refectory will be connected with the dormitory 
building for the benefit of students. The rate of the board will be .'J4..50 to S5.50 
per month." 

"The degree of Master of Arts, M. A. is open to resident graduates of all regular 
colleges, who have received the degree of B. A." 

"If you doubt this, write for proof to tiie author." 

(Taken jrom early catalogues of the institution) 



HfSBSHk 



Page Thirty 



880 



history of ^reshyteriaru Qollege^ 

^' i HE EXISTENCE and early continuance of the Presbyterian College of South Carolina 
Vj I was due to the faith, energy and influence of Rev. Wm. P. Jacobs. D.D., LLD. Dr. 
I Jacobs came to Clinton as a young minister in 1864, and although the town did not 
^«^ have as many as four hundred inhabitants as late as 1880, he had in the meantime built 
up a strong Presbyterian Church, founded the Orphanage which perpetuates his memory, and 
and shaped the beginnings of the Presbyterian College of South Carolina, 

After Dr, Jacobs came to Clinton in 1864, there was an active interest taken in education. 
The Clinton Academy building in 1872 was offered by its owners to the Clinton High School Asso- 
ciation organized for the purpose of furnishing better educational advantages. This organization 
continued to conduct a community school supported by private funds until 1880. 

In 1880. an organization was formed of the pastor and officers and some members of the First 
Presbyterian Church of Clinton. This group was granted a charter in July. 1882. by the Clerk of 
Court of Laurens County with the right to adopt its own bylaws and confer the usual college 
diplomas and degrees. The first catalog states that the buildings were neat, well located and 
comfortable, but scarcely sufficient for the purpose for which they were intended. 

The teaching force began by operating two separate and distinct schools under one manage- 
ment. This charter provided that, "the Clinton College Association is hereby made a body in- 
corporate and politic consisting of the pastor, elders and deacons of the Clinton Presbyterian Church 
and any other church or churches that may be formed from it located in the Town of Clinton and 
in connection with the Presbyterian Church in the L'nited States and their successors duly ap- 
pointed; of such ten other persons resident in or near the Town of Clinton as the said Association 
may associate with themselves; and two persons from each Presbytery in this State." The charter 
also said that, '"the Association shall have the right to confer all degrees and diplomas usual in 
colleges as may be recommended by the faculty of the Presbyterian College of South Carolina 
and the Clinton Collegiate Institute for Young Ladies. " These were in reality one and the same. 

From this it appears that it was originally intended that the college should be an institution 
for the Presbyterians of the State. The courage and determination of the founder of this school 
appear most admirable in view of the fact that the Presbyterians in South Carolina had been unable 
after many efforts to maintain a school of higher learning within the bounds of the State. The 
influence of such men as Dr. Thornwell, whom young Jacobs admired greatly, but who was opposed 
to the church's engaging in secular training, did not deter him from these aims which are now 
so harmonious with the spirit of the entire church. Certainly this was a vision attended with 
great hope and faith. .Many minor changes and adjustments were made and expedients were em- 
ployed necessary to accommodate the enterprise to indifference, opposition and misunderstandings. 

The college with its appendage, the preparatory school, had in 1882, Prof. W. S. Lee in charge 
of the college department. Rev, Z, L. Holmes assistant and in charge of the preparatory department. 
There was a primary department with Mrs, M. .\, Lee in charge, while Miss Pattie Thornwell 
taught music. There were ninety pupils in attendance. The next year. Prof, J, H, Colton was a 
teacher in the preparatory department. The first graduating class had three members, among them 
Dr. Jacobs' daughter, Miss Florence L. Jacobs, who was followed in succeeding years by her four 
brothers who also graduated from this institution. At this time the entire expenses, including 
board and tuition, were SlOO payable in advance. This amount was the rate for about fifteen 
years. Professor Lee continued to seive the college until 1889. Rev. R. P. Smith was President 
in 1887, and Prof. Edwin L. Barnes was a member of the faculty from 1885 to 1887. In 1884, 



CIEBBtt 



Page Thirty-one 



880 



Samuel P. Fulton graduated. His services as missionary to Japan, as well as his ability and 
spiritual-mindedness, will always be remembered. 

In 1888. Mr. John W. Kennedy became President and served till his death two^ years later. 
Prof. W. S. Lee entered his last year of connection with the school. W. J. Martin. Jr.. now Presi- 
dent of Davidson College, taught this year. He was succeeded by R. R. Stevenson. R. K. Long 
of Batesville, Arkansas, was added to the faculty in January. 1910. Forty-one students were 
classified as belonging to the Collegiate Department. 

The title of "Presbyterian College of South Carolina" had been substituted for "Clinton 
College by 1890;" the courses and instruction were modeled along the lines in use in other col- 
leges; many young men were being prepared to enter professional training in medicine, the minis- 
try, etc., a number of Presbyterian ministers were now listed as alumni; and a dozen ministerial 
students were in attendance. However, the control as well as the ownership was local and the 
College had no separate campus or buildings for its exclusive use. 

The next fifteen years, from 1890 to 1905. were years of difficulty. Those who stood by the 
institution doing this period deserve the appreciation of the church for giving themselves to the 
discouraging and apparently forlorn struggle to preserve the school's existence until the change 
of time and sentiment should secure it as a part of the essential work of the Synod as a whole. 

J. 1. Cleland was President for three years, from 1890 to 1893. He was succeeded by Rev. 
E. C. Murray whose presidency lasted till 1897. D. \L Frierson, who afterwards taught so long 
at the Presbyterian College at Batesville. Arkansas, was Professor of Mathematics and Natural 
Science till 1896. when L. L. Campbell served for one year. Mr. J. B. Townsend taught English 
and Chemistry in 189:21893. Dr. W. H. Young gave instruction in Physiology and Hygiene for 
two years before 1893. Rev. J. F. Jacobs became Professor of Biblical and Religious Literature, 
Ethics and Hebrew in 1890. He was also financial agent and secured the erection of the structure 
now called the .\lumni Hall, besides a small refectory and professor's residence. Mr. Jacobs and 
his wife managed the dormitory and dining hall, while he taught till 1896. Dr. W. S. Bean who 
had come to Clinton as editor of the Soulhern Presbyterian, began his connection with the College 
in 1892. He was a most learned and cultured gentleman. His relations with the College con- 
tinued until his death in 1920. In 1896. the Martin brothers joined the faculty. S. T. Martin and 
A. V. Martin. The former died soon afterwards with pneumonia. The latter, after an intermis- 
sion, returned to the College and has steadfastly given himself as one of those by whom the College 
was kept alive and at last made illustrious. 

Prof. A. E. Spencer, known and honored throughout the Southern Presbyterian Church as a 
great and devoted Presbyterian Elder, became President in 1897. and served as such till 1904. He 
came to the College from the Reidville school in 1889. He has served three times as President 
and taught Greek and French and other subjects in the Institution for 39 years. During all these 
years the responsibility for the institution has frequently rested upon his shoulders. His tact and 
temperate judgment have been as valuable as his teaching skill. No tribute or explanation could 
convey a proper sense of the devotion and worth of Dr. Spencer as an administrator and instructor. 
While engaged in the task of teaching he directed the financial and administrative affairs of the 
College in the midst of great difficulties. Hr fully merited the appreciation repeatedly expressed 
by the Synod of South Carolina. 

Dr. Spencer was President while Rev. W. T. Matthews was Chancellor for two years, from 
1898 to 1900. who was followed in the same office by Rev. J. H. Thorjiwell whose enthusiasm and 
personality did much to spread the sentiment in the church for taking over the institution by the 
Presbyterians. The office of Chancellor was intended to be a means of publicity and of securing 
financial aid. 

Mr. A. W. McWhorter served the College as Professor of Latin for several years, beginning 
in 1897. During many years, before this and afterward. Dr. J. J. Boozer, a beloved physician ol 
the community, furnished in'^lnnlion in Physiology and Hygiene. Dr. J. W. Davis taught the 



(CSEEtt 



Page Thirty-ltio 



880 



same subjects several years and has remained llie College physician to ihe present time. Rev. 
M. G. Woodworth taught English two years, beginning in 1902. After an intermission of two 
years he came back in 1906 and still continues with the College. 

When the Synod came into possession of the school in 1904 the traditional and customary 
features of a college had already taken on their familiar forms and interests; two literary societies 
had been engaging in declamation, debating, oratory and such like exercises for many years. The 
Eukosmian society had been founded in 1883. .\nother was in existence about the same time. 
The Philomathian society came into existence in 1894. Two Greek letter fraternities were in 
existence at one time, but these were forbidden and went out of existence till permission was 
again given for their opening in 1916. Two college journals were issued by the students, or rather 
a journal under two names. The Journal in 1893 and the Palladian in 1894. Volume 1, No. 1 of 
The Educational Journal of South Carolina appeared March, 1890. It was to be published monthly 
under the auspices of the Presbyterian College of South Carolina. D. M. Fulton was editor. Its 
first list of contributors were: \^ m. P. Jacobs; W. M. Grier, President of Erskine College; A. 
Coke Smith, afterwards Methodist Bishop and brother of Senator E. D. Smith; S. Lander, founder 
of Lander College; Prof. H. P. .Sanders; J. G. Clinkscales. A Young Men's Christian .Association 
had more than a formal existence from the beginning. It was a very active and stimulating organ- 
ization in the religious experience of the campus. The literary societies in the beginning owned a 
collection of books. From time to time donations from Prof. J. R. Blake, Dr. W. E. Mcllwaine 
and others are noted. As a result a library was gradually accumulated. The college degrees 
offered and the quality and extent of the work required for graduation were given more serious 
attention as time passed. The older men who were in charge of the institution were inclined to- 
ward the older and dignified discipline of the classics with some additions of Philosophy and gen- 
eral science. The young men who joined the college from time to time as professors brought not 
only youthful spirit, fresh ideas, but new contact with the academic usages and branches from 
their own Almae Matres. The degrees of .\.B., B.S., and M.A. were offered. Very early it was 
A.B. for young men and".\.M.", which was explained as "'Mistress of Arts," for girls who might 
substitute French for Latin in securing it. This degree did not last long. It was later, along with 
the usual college degrees, offered for study conforming to the conventional and prevailing usages. 

Those who took partial or complete courses in the twenty-five years up to 1905 had become 
well known and influential in many cases. There were alumni filling reputable positions in all 
walks of life. .\s the school was co-educalional and so continued until 1920. many women re- 
ceived training here. The female graduates were mainly of the local patronage. All these men 
and women formed quite a respectable alumni showing for a school that had been so long a local 
and personal enterprise. Perhaps, more than a thousand altogether had been under its instruction 
during this first quarter of a century prior to the Synod's assumption. 

In 1882. the college as well as the preparatory school had buildings in the northern part of 
the village. In 1886, the college department moved into a building on the Thornwell Orphanagv' 
grounds. For this the first thousand dollars was subscribed by Mr. M. S. Bailey and J. W. Cope- 
land. Sr. This structure was purchased by the Orphanage in 1905 and named the McCall Build- 
ing. Mr. Copeland also with Mr. Newton Young gave the sixteen acres of land that formed the 
nucleus of the present campus. Ipon this was erected Alumni Hall. The funds for this were 
secured by Rev. J. F. Jacobs from Presbyterian congregations and members throughout the State. 
Here a residence also was erected. These two were used by students as dormitories as well as resi- 
dence by professors. Up to this time nonresident students boarded in town. A frame dining 
room and kitchen stood near the .\lumni Hall. These three buildings, the sixteen acres of land 
and the McCall building on the Thornwell Orphanage campus constituted the college property as 
it came into the hands of the Svnod. 



(iSENs 



Page Thirty-three 



880 



The corporate body that owned the college was named in the first charter in 1882. This 
charter was modified in 1889 so that two trustees might be appointed by each Presbytery. The 
local trustees were reduced to nine. The Presbyteries one after another had gradually consented to 
appoint trustees so that all six Presbyteries of the Synod were represented on the board in 1903, 
when there was a second change of charter. The Synod declined in 1896 to take ownership, but 
gave a most cordial endorsement. The reluctant but final consent to make the college unequivocally 
Synodical in 190-1-. was expressed in the charter of February, 1905. which was the charter of the 
college till 1929. The college once again altered its relation within the church. In recent years 
it has been evident that adequate support and patronage must be supplied by a larger background 
of church membership than formerly thought necessary. In 1928 the Synod of Georgia united with 
the Synod of South Carolina in the ownership and control of the college, thus strengthening its 
resources and field of service. In conformity to this plan the charter was again revised to meet 
this change. 

Dr. W. G. Neville took the presidency of the Presbyterian College in the fall of 1904. but his 
task was no easy one. His incumbency was attended by a Synod-wide unity, but also with a 
Synod-wide ignorance of the cost of higher education. There was a fair and delightful promise 
of success, but a realization of the necessary financial outlay implied in the ideals of the 
Synod was most remote. The announcement that an endowment of one hundred thousand dollars 
and a building fund of fifty thousand dollars to be completed by 1908 at the present, appears naive 
as it now requires almost the former amount for annual expenditure. Yet this project was a most 
ambitious one at that time. Within four years the campus was more than doubled in acreage, the 
building on the Orphanage campus sold; a remarkably well-planned Administration Building was 
constructed; a Presidents home and several residences were erected by 1909; Judd Dining Hall 
was finished as the result of a gift of $5,000 by Mrs. E. A. Judd of Spartanburg and S2.000 by the 
people of Clinton; Laurens Hall, a dormitory, represented the generosity of the Laurens people; 
Clinton citizens had already contributed S20.000 to the building program and campus; Rev. J. C. 
Shive had been employed and was most successful as financial agent. 

These improvements were inaugurated by Dr. Neville who did not live to see them finished. 
His sudden death was a severe loss, cheeking the confidence of the friends of the college and 
leaving an atmosphere of uncertainty and some discouragement for the following five years. 

Dr. Robert Adams was called to the presidency from his church in Laurens and served till 
1910. Dr. Adams undertook the presidency at a most difficult time. The spirit of discouragement 
seemed to pervade the Synod for several years. Not only were trustees continued in Davidson 
College by most of the Presbyteries but appeals for funds were constantly made and contributions 
through the regular channels within the Synod for Church and Christian Education were still 
shared with that institution. The competitive canvass for students was also kept up till sometime 
after Dr. Douglas came in 1911. Thus, entire allegiance to the Synod's college was deferred till 
after Dr. Adams' time. Dr. Spencer was acting President for a year after Dr. Adams resignation. 

In 1904. Bothwell Graham. Jr.. began his connection with the college with which he has re- 
mained to the present. C. T. Cunningham taught English and History one year. 1905-1906. In 
1908, J. Wideman Ligon was added to the faculty. He remained two years. John S. Henry 
taught .Mathematics and History during the year 1909-1910. Dr. Neville taught the course in 
Bible, as did Dr. Robert Adams, in connection with his administrative supervision. In 1910, the 
important element in the curriculum, namely instruction in the Bible, came into the hands of Dr. 
D. J. Brimm, formerly professor in Columbia Seminary. His gifts as a teacher and his learning 
in the Scriptures have made that department a special feature of this institution. 

It was most courteous and fitting that Dr. Jacobs should have been elected by Enoree Pres- 
bytery as a trustee. He was made also President of the first Board of Trustees from the Presby- 
teries. He was succeeded by Dr. S. C. Byrd to whom no adequate tribute can be given as a moving 



mem 



Page Thirty-four 



880 



spirit, not only in securing the college as a Synodical institution, but as an unfailing and active 
friend of Presbyterian education for many jears. More than casual mention should be made of 
another President of the Board of Trustees, Dr. Alexander Martin. His staunch loyalty and 
sound judgment have been invaluable. He was elected trustee of Bethel Presbytery and has re- 
mained such to the present time. His influence and his counsel have been of highest considera- 
tion in the conduct of the affairs of the college. The college has been most fortunate in its Board 
of Trustees who have been sympathetic and interested in the work and life of both professors and 
students. 

It was at the suggestion and persuasion of Dr. W. M. McPheeters that the Presbyterian College 
secured the able services of Dr. D. M. Douglas, who came to the presidency from the Maryland 
.\venue Presbyterian Church of Baltimore. Very soon after he entered upon his exclusively ad- 
ministrative duties in August. 1911. his sanity, honesty and foresight had secured not only the 
confidence and admiration of the Presbyterians, but the regard and interest of the general public 
of South Carolina. 

Within his first yeaj's tenure the physical and financial resources were greatly increased. Mr. 
Chas. W. Leavitt of New York, a landscape artist of national reputation, laid out a plan of grounds 
and buildings, "with dormitories designed to accommodate eventually a large number of students; 
two science halls, library, chapel, athletic field, and everything else which pertains to the equip- 
ment of a first-class college." Since then, this ambitious and courageous plan has been largely 
realized. Spencer Hall was built during the second year from funds raised by Dr. Douglas in 
Chicago and New York and from gifts received in Clinton, as well as from Col. Leroy Springs. Mr. 
David Carmichael and Mr. Henry McHarg. In 1915. the W. P. Jacobs Science Hall and Library 
was erected at a cost of something over $40,000. In 1916. a central heating plant was built. This 
cost $12,000 and was partly the gift of Mr. George Cornelson. In 1924 the Smyth dormitory and 
the LeRoy Springs Gymnasium were erected, the former named for Dr. Thomas Smyth, whose 
son, Capt. E. A. Smyth gave $25,000 toward its erection, while Col. LeRoy Springs sustained the 
entire cost of the gymnasium of $100,000. In 1929. Col. Springs completed the swimming pool at 
an additional cost of $50,000. In 1928, W. J. Bailey of Clinton. S, C. made possible the erection 
of the $25,000 Stadium in honor of William Cyrus Bailey by the contribution of $10,000. Then 
in 1929, Mr. John H. Young gave the splendid President's home as a memorial to the late George 
Young. Private benefactors have increased and the friendship of the private membership in the 
churches of the Synod has been secured. 

Walter A. Johnson whose reputation is wide and whose services have been sought by so many 
other institutions, began his leadership in the athletic department in 1915 and continuous to the 
present with L. S. McMillian who entered as assistant coach in 1924. For the past few years, 
H. L. Eichelberger has been assisting in the coaching. 

In 1911 when Dr. Douglas came to Presbyterian College, there were eighty students, about 
half of them doing strictly college work. There were young women as well as young men. While 
the college has never definitely refused to receive young women into its classes, the number apply- 
ing for admission gradually declined and finally ceased. The student body has grown until it 
now has nearly 300 students. The library has more than 12.000 volumes. The curriculum is 
designed not only to meet the needs of ordinary, literary and scientific requirements, but to furnish 
free medical and other preparations for graduate work. The college keeps in mind the aim of 
emphatically Christian education and devotes itself to training a large number of men for the 
ministry and other positions in the church. 

In 1926 Dr. Douglas resigned from Presbyterian College to accept the presidency of the Uni- 
versity of South Carolina. Dr. A. E. Spencer acted as President until the summer of 1927 when 



CIBIENe 



Page Thirty-five 



880 



Dr. B. L. Parkinson of University of South Carolina accepted the presidency. He was President 
for one year only, resigning in 1928 to accept a position in the State Department of Education in 
Alabama. 

The college was very fortunate in securing as its President Rev. John .McSween who entered 
on his duties in September, 1928, and immediately applied all his energies toward the removing of 
the indebtedness of the college which had accumulated to the amount of $375,000. due mainly 
to the failure to collect the subscriptions of the million dollar campaign. So far, about half of 
this amount has been secured. President McSween has shown himself to have all the compacities 
of a superior administrative officer. He has all the gifts that make him a born President of the 
college and has lived up to his consecration to relieving this college of its indebtedness and putting 
it in the front rank of denominational institutions in the South. He has a thorough understanding 
of young men and sympathy with them in their problems, his high ethical standards and his deep 
religious influence exercise a salutary influence over the students and he enjoys the love, respect 
and admiration of the entire student body. 

To the teaching staff of recent years, much credit is due towards Presbyterian College's 
admittance into the Southern Association of schoo's and colleges. The faculty is composed of men 
of approved educational advantages and they have proven themselves as skilled teachers. In addi- 
tion to the names already mentioned, the following faculty list with changes is the complete roll of 
p-ofessors in recent years: N. L. T. Nelson. 1912-1914; A. N. Young. 1913-1914: A. C. Cartledge, 
1913-191.5; J. B. Kennedy, 1913 to the present; A. R. McLaughlin. 1914-1916; C. B. Bailey. 1916- 
1917; Rev. E. H. Pressley, 1916-1917; St. Clair Hays, 1916-1918; 1929 to present; Horatio Hughes, 
1918-1919; W. E. Hoy, 1918-1929; Rev. F. D. Jones, 1919 to present; H. E. Sturgeon. 1919 to pres- 
ent: M. W. Brown, 1925 to present; H. T. Lilly. 1924 to 1926; A. T. Fant. 1922-1929; R. L. Coe, 
1924 to present; R. J. Seeger, 1929 to present; H. T. Sweedenberg, 1929 to present. Since the 
establishment of the military department, the fol'owing officers have served: Major F. J. DeRohan. 
1919-1920; Col. E. L. Glasgow. 1921-1929; Major C. S. McNeil. 192.3-1924; Lieut. D. R. Nimmocks. 
1922-1928: Lieut. A. N. Taylor, 1928 to present; Capt. R. E. Wysor, 1929 to present. Aside from 
strong and inspiring personalities that has graced the recitation halls and who have quickened 
the minds of nearly three generations of students, the academic preparation of professors is sug- 
gestive. The men who have been on the teaching staff came with degree fvom: Davidson (16), 
Presbyterian College (6). Erskine and South Carolina Medical College (4l each. University of 
Virginia, LIniversity of Georgia, Vanderbilt, Johns Hopkins, University of Chicago, Hampden- 
Sidney (3) each. Harvard and Charleston 12) each. Centre College (2). Other professors have 
come from graduate work at Peabody, Columbia University, Wisconsin and oilier instilulimis of 
equal rank. 

It is now the golden anniversary of Presbyterian College: it has existed for fifty years. It has 
a list of alumni whose names are now enrolled as part of the worthy citizenship and professional 
life of the State, and whose labors are fruitful and whose distinctions are creditable to the whole 
Presbvterian Church. 



WEEtti 



Page Thirty-six 



880 




AiuiyiSTirATioy 



« 



1930 



fk 



Page Thirty-seven 



880 




KKV. J()H\ M(:.S\\EE\. B.S., B.D.. Presidt-m 



ti 



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Page Thirty-eight 




880 




Marshall Walton Brown. B.A.. M.A., Dean 



ti 



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OE 



Page Thirty-nine 



880 










..(V 



L/ 



I 



faculty 



Abram Venable Martin 

B.A. 

llampden-Sidney College; University 
iif Virginia; Corne'l University 

Professor of Mathmetics 

Almon Edwin Spencer 

B.A., M.A.. LL.D. 

Centre Collese 

Vice-President and Professor of 

Greek and French 

Malcolm G. Woodworth 

B.A., M.A.. D.D. 

Hampflfn Sidney College; Union 

Seminary 

Professor of English 

BoTHWELL Graham, Jr. 

B.A., M.A. 

University of Georgia; Harvard 

University; American Academy 

in Rome 

Professor oj Latin and German 

Daniel Johnson Brimm 

B.A.. M.A.. D.D. 
."^imtliwestern Presbyterian Univer- 
sity; Columbia Seminary 

Professor of Bible and Religion 

Roger Lehevv Coe 

B.A.. M.A. 

Presbyterian College; University 

of Virginia 

Professor of Education 



I'tiL'c Fiirly 



« 



930 



^> 



880 



faculty 



James Boyd Kennedy 

B.A.. M.A.. Ph.D. 

Erskine College; Johns Hopkins 

University 

Professor of Economics 
and Sociology 

H. T. SWEEDENBURG 

B.A.. M.A. 

Presbyterian College: Columbia 

University 

Assis!ant Professor of English 

Frank Dudley Jones 

B.A.. D.D. 
Davidson College; Columbia 

Seminary 

Professor of Psychology 

and Philosophy 

Harry Elwin Sturgeon 

B.A., M.S. 

Cooper College: Purdue University; 

University of Chicago 

Professor of Chemistry 

R. E. Wysor 

Captain. United States Army 
\ irginia Military Institution 

Professor of Military Science 
and Tactics 

R. J. Seeger 

A.B.. Ph.D. 

Rutgers College; Yale University 

Professor of Physics 






ti 



930 



Oe 



Page Forty-one 



880 




faculty 




♦ <» 



Foster Bell Parham 

Sergeant. Detached Enlisted 
Mens List 

Assistant in Military Science 
and Tactics 



Alfred Nelson Taylor 

First Lieutenant of Infantry U. S. A. 

Kenyon College: Lnileil Stales 

Infantry School 

Assistant Professor of Mililar) 

Science and Tactics 

Walter A. Johnson 

Normal School of Plnsical Educa 

tion. Battle Creek Michifian: I ni- 

versity of \^isconsin: I niversily of 

Illinois 

Physical Director 

Lonnie Sexton McMilll\n 
b.a. 

Presbyterian College; Lniversity of 
Illinois 

Assistant Physical Director 




St. Clair Hays 

A.B.. M.D. 

Presbyterian College; Columbia 

University 

Professor of Biology 

Marshall Walton Brown 

B.A.. M.A. 

Centre College; I niversily 

of \ ienna 

Dean and Professor of History 



ti 



1930 



Page Forty-two 



fk 



880 



Officers 



WiLLARD Leonard Jones 

B.A. 

Presbyterian College; Library 

Course, University of North 

Carolina 

Librarian 

Mrs. Myrtle Hunter 
Matron 

Mrs. M. W. Brown 

Registrar 

John Holland Hunter 

B.A. 

Presbyterian College 

Business Manager 






1930 




Page Forty-lhree 



880 



cAlma (fMate 



r 



^Mong Piedmont hills of old S. C. 

There stands a college called P. C. 
She's dear to me this old P. C. 

Where every day is happy. 

P. C, P. C, hoiv dear thou art to me. 

P. C, P. C, we'll e'er be true to thee, 
P. C, P. C, we'll ever sing thy praise. 

We'll sing thy praise through all our days, 
All hail to thee. 

All honor to thy learned walls. 

Thy campus and historic halls. 
We'll sing thy praise through all our days. 

Our well loved Alma Mater. 

P. C. P. C, how dear thou art to me. 

P. C, P. C, we'll e'er be true to thee, 
P. C, P. C, we'll ever sing thy praise. 

We'll sing thy praise through all our days. 
All hail to thee. 



1930 



fk 



page Foil} jour 



880 




« 



930 



i»> 



Page Furtyfii 



880 




Joe Bahb 

President 



Senior Qlass ^oerru 

<s> <$> 

'Tis not alone in knowing what to do. 
Nor yet the building of a perfect plan. 
'Tis not alone the will to carry through 
That is the truest measure of a man. 

Tis not achievement, just to learn alone. 
But doing what we've learned — that is the best. 
'Tis laying, day by day, another stone. 
Thai builds the stairway of a true success. 

—Poet. '30 



ti 



1930 



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Page Forty-six 



880 



history of the^ Qlass of '^o 

By Louis R. Williamson 

HISTORY IS, after all. merely the story of the struggles which man has made 
against nature, against an innate fear of the natural elements, and against the 
loves, hatreds, and desires of other men. Through it all, there has been one 
goal, toward the attainment of which, man has been working for thousands 
and some say — for millions of years. That goal is the revelation of Truth, revealed 
to man by the God who created him — a creature after His own image, made to love 
and serve Him until the consumation of the world. 

Today, after the struggles of our ancestors, extending over a period of innumer- 
able centuries; we stand a free people, rejoicing in our freedom, our knowledge, and 
our modernity, and looking toward the future with eyes that are filled with the joys 
of living and hearts that overflow with love for our fellow-men. 

Thus it was that we were enabled to enter the sacred portals of this college as 
Freshmen, to carry burdensome trunks up countless flights of stairs, to post a multi- 
tude of letters, and to withstand the onslaughts of battle-scarred Sophomores in the 
place that is especially reserved for such things. Thus it was that we were duly 
initiated into the awful mysteries of secret orders and were oriented to the customs 
and traditions that have grown up on this campus through decades of habitation. 
For the Sophomore year, we cannot be too enthusiastic, — it was a kaleidoscopic year 
of football games, rat parades and lab periods — mostly lab periods. As Juniors we 
began to learn to prepare ourselves for the manv duties and offices that were to be 
thrust upon us by the eager hands of the departing Seniors. As a class, we faced 
the problems that were before us with unflinching eyes. We fell that we had reason 
to be confident of our ability to carry on. Altogether, we think of our Junior year, as 
we review its high points, as a succession of colorful football games, basketball 
tournaments, battalion parades and Pan-Hellenic and Junior-Senior banquets and 
dances. Incidentally, perhaps we had better add that we also met classes our Junior 
year. The year passed quickly — as years will pass — and then we were — Seniors! 

The astounding fact that we had at last attained to that class of earthly immortals 
known as College Seniors astonished even the most lethargic of us. Almost un- 
believable but nevertheless — true. We approached the year with a feeling of trepi- 
dation mingled with a new sense of responsibilitv. Now, indeed, we were responsi- 
bile for the actions of the underclassmen as well as for our own conduct. We took 
over editorships, captaincies and managerships with an air of profound knowledge 
and complete nonchalance. The months flew by. We strained every brain fibre, 
nerve and sinew in one supreme, last effort to exalt the fair name of our Alma Mater 
and to advance ourselves in thought, word and deed. 

The date of graduation approached and we began to concentrate more seriously 
on the question that had confronted us for four years. After graduation — what? 
What were we going to do with our lives? What were we going to do for God — for 
our fellow-men — for ourselves? Those were the questions. And then we began to 
realize that out of the mental chaos into which our minds had been hurled by our 
years of study and absorption of knowledge; there must come to us an order of 
things and a definite philosophy of life; one that we would be able to place our hand 
upon at any time and say with conviction — '"This is what I believe." 

Thus it is that as we go out into the world to take our places as vital forces in 
its life, we have learned that our lives must be governed by love and not hatred, by 
altruism and not selfishness, and by belief and not unbelief in the things that are 
of God. 



Cd 



930 



Page Forty-seven 



Studenp--^ ^ody S^^^tistics 

Most Popular Professor Dr. A. E. Spencer 

.\Jost Popular Student P. A. ROBERTS 

Most Cheerful J. B. Green 

Most Loyal F. D. Rogers 

Most Talented C. W. Grafton 

Most Friendly E. E. Wade 

Neatest Fant Thornley 

Best Informed R. T. Gillespie 

Most Courteous W. H. Jackson 

Handsomest J. B. Green 

Ye Lmlies Man Fant Thornley 

Most Literary B. H. DiCKSON 

Most Militaristic C. W. Grafton 

Best Journalist C. W. Grafton 

Wittiest Tracy Flemming 

Most Dignified J. A. Babb 

Best Sport Ross Lynn 

Best Orator T. M. JOHNSTON 

Best Debator G. G. PALMER 

Most Perfect Physique D. L. WoOD 

With Most Promise C. W. Grafton 

Best Ail-Round Athlete J. B. Green 

Best Business Man R. S. Crawford 

Best All-Round Man Ross Lynn 



1930 



I'agr Forty-eight 



Oe 




Page Forty-nine 




Page Fifty 




Page Fifty-one 




Page Fifty -two 




Page Fijty-three 




Pa$e Fifty-jour 




Page Fijly-fivc 




Page Fijty-six 




I'age Fijty-seven 




Page Fifly-eight 




Page Fijty-nine 




I'dge Sixty 





Jack Styles Dendy 

WaLHALLA. SoiTH CAROLI^A 




B.S. 

Alpha Lambda Tau 
Chi Beta Phi, Sigma I'psilon, Lambda Phi Gamma 

Membership in scientific, literary, and musical fraternities should 
indicate that Jack Dendy is a versatile and well-rounded man. He is. 
Jack is the type of man who puts his best into everything that he 
undertakes, and yet does not get excited about it. To paraphrase 
the poet, "he keeps the even tenor of his way." Jack has the ca- 
pacity for sitting down and doing tedious tasks thoroughly and well — 
an unusual capacity, and one that indicates a prosperous future. 

Boxing Team. 'ia-'SO ; Block •■?" Club ; Rifle Team. 30 : Assistant In 
Biology. '30 : "Blue Stocking" Staff. '30 ; Collegian Staff, '30 ; Corresiionding 
Secretary Chi Beta Phi : President Chi Beta Phi, '30 ; Corporal, '29 ; Krst 
Lieutenant. '30 R.O.T.C. 



Page Sixty-one 




Page Sixty-two 




Page Sixty-three 




Pane Sixty-jour 





Carlyle Devon Floyd 

Ml'llins, South Carolina 
B.A. 

Some men are made to be dashing and careless — others are made 
to be studious and rather bashful. There is a place in the world 
for both types. "Moonbeam." as he has been affectionately called 
for four years, is the studious and the bashful. His class work 
never suffers for any reason. Floyd makes sure that one laborer is 
worthy of his hire, at any rate. Such a statement places him among 
the minority who actually try to learn something while they are at 
college. What a small minority it is! 

Pluloniatliean Literary .Suciely, 'V\ ; Mini.steriul Cliili; Class Baslietljal 
■28, '29 ; ("lass Football, '30. 




Page Sixty-five 




Page Sixty-six 




Page Sixty-seven 




Page Sixty-eight 




Page Sixty-nine 




Page Seventy 




Page Seventy-one 




I'apc Seventy-two 




Page Seventy-three 




Page Sevenly-four 




Page Sevenly-juc 




Page Seventy-six 




Page Seventy-seven 




Page Seventy-eight 




Charles Jennings Martin 

Ml'llixs. SoiTH Carolina 

B.A. 

Alpha Kappa Pi 
Sigma Kappa Alpha 

His name seems to be Charles Jennings Martin, yet they call 
him "Jack". Perliaps it is because when you look at him you like 
him. and when you like a person you instinctively want to tag him 
with some short abbreviated name. "Jack" doesn't let anyihinf! 
worry him. and yet he gets along remarkably well with everyone. 
He is willing to cooperate at all times. Good followership is almost 
as rare, if not equally as rare, as good leadership. A fine athlete 
and a fine student — that unbeatable combination again. 

Football, •27, '28, '29: Track, '26, '29, 'SO: Vlass Basketball, '28, '29; 
"PaC-SaC" Staff, '30 : Pan-Hellenic Council, '30 : Block "P" Club ; Min- 
isterial Club ; Corporal, '29, Captain, '30 R.O.T.C. 




Page Seventy-nine 




Page Eighty 




Page Eighty-one 




Page Eighly-tiio 




Page Eighty-three 




Page Eighty-lour 




Page Eiglily-five 




Fage Eighty-six 




Page Eighly-seven 




I'agc lughty-cighl 




Page Eighty-nine 




Page Ninety 




Page Ninety-one 



% 




/'rti'e ISinely-lHo 



/ 




Pdge Ninely-tliiee 




/'ogc A'incly-joiir 




Page Nil) fly-jive 




Page Ninety-six 



8 80 




1930 



fk 



Page Ainelyseven 



880 




Ross Lynn 

President 



'junior Qlass ToerrL^ 

'Be sure you're right, then go ahead," 
'Tis rumored Davie Crocket said. 
But if success's door should close, 
As if it ivere right on your nose. 
And knocks and pounds ivon't get you through. 
But only leave you bruised and blue, 
And still you're not behind it, 
Dont waste your time to pound and knock, 
For there's a key to every lock. 
Just set about to find it. 



li 



930 



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Page Ninety-eight 



880 



Junior Qlass history 



By T. .M. Johnston 



<S> ^ 



•^^^■^HE FALL of 1927 found assembled the present Junior 

I I "^ class eighty-six strong, with all the enthusiam and pep 

V| y possible for a new rat class at P. C. In three days we 

were settled down to the routine of college life. Then 

came the upper classmen, with palmettoes, long standing hazing 

customs, and lastly, the night of rat run. How we lived through 

it, we still wonder, but as we glance back, we are proud of this as 

the beginning of that P. C. spirit which had its origin those first 

few nights of our college life. 

With the opening of the football season came the knowledge 
that the Class of '31 had athletic material that was to rival any 
single class in the history of the school We came through the 
season with flying colors, made a fine record in basketball, and 
closed our first year by winning the state track title. 

In the second year, our class put the new rats through the 
paces and then turned its thoughts to football. Six men made the 
varsity and in all other sports had full share of the honors. Our 
president of the year before, Bernie Dunlap did not return. Bev- 
erly Young guided us through the sophomore year and its climax, 
winning the S. I. A. A. track meet was largely due to our class. 

Now we are in our third year with Ross Lynn leading us. A 
few more months and we will be on the last paths that lead from 
college life. With a record of which we are proud, we hope to 
seal our last year and thereby leave in the P. C. hall of fame a 
record which we can return years hence and look with pride. 



li 



1930 



>^ 



Page Ninety-nine 



880 




R. W. Abell 

Chester, S. C. 
EiittTed from Ck'nison, '2^. 

W. E. Barnwell 

Climoin. S. C. 

Krt'sliinan Fonthali. '27 ; Freshman Basketball, ' 
\'iirsil\ Track. ';iu : Literary Society, '28. 



W. M. Blakely 
Clinton, S. C. 

riiiloniatiican Literary Society. 



T, J. Blalock, Jr. 

Clinton, .S. C. 
Pi Kappa Phi 

Freslimaii Footliall, Hitle Team, "29, '30. 



J. B. BoWEiN 

Waycross, Ga. 

Hasl<etl)all. 'HO: Tracl<. '30; KiitereiJ .Sdiool, '30. 



L, S, Cannon 
Lai'rkns, S, C, 

Eiilcrcd S<iiocil I roiii ('ollei:e of Charleston, '30. 



0, W. Chapin, Jr, 

.St. Louis, Mo. 

Ilp'ha Lambda Tau. Sigma Kappa Alpha. 
Gamma Sigma, Pi Kappa Delta, I.R.C. 

Fresliman Track; Varsity Track, '29, '30; Y.M.C.A. 
Cabinet, '29; Secretary and Treasurer, '30: Sec- 
retary and Treasurer State Y.AL(\A. : F eslnnan 
Debater: Varsity liehatcr. '29: "Blue SlockiiiK" 
Stall', '27: ManaEinK Editor. '30: Edltor-in-Cliief. 
'30: Colk't'ian Staff. '30: iMember BlocU "P" Club. 



C. A. COMPTON 

l.AURE.'NS, S, C, 

Corjioral H.O.T.C. 



Page One Hundred 



li 



930 



^> 



880 



J. I. COPELAND 

Clinton". S. C. 

Pi Kappa Delta, Sigma I psiton. l.R.C. 
Ulee Club, '29, '30 ; Vice-President Suphnmore 
Class : Winner Freshman -Soidiomore Declaimer's 
Medal, '28; Fresliman Debating Team: Varsity 
Debating Team, '29. "30 ; Collegian StalT, '28, '29, 
'30: "Blue Stocking" Staff. '29, '30: Y.M.C.A. 
Cabinet, '30. 



H. W. D.wis 
Clinton. S. C. 

Rifle Team, '29, '30: Coriinral R.O.T.C. 

W. W. Davis 

Clinton. .S. C. 
Pi Kappa Phi 
Corporal R.O.T.C. 

J. A. Dougherty 
Bl.4ck Mocnt.\in. N. C. 

O. A. Dl.nlap 

Rock Hill. S. C. 

Beta Kappa. Sigrtia Kappa Alpha. l.R.C. 

Freshman For»;ball, Freshman Basketball : Varsity 

Fnntball, '29, 'SO: Varsity Basketball, '29, '30; 

Varsity Baseball, '29. 



J. S. EUBANKS. Jr. 
Ellenton. S. C. 



Literary Society, '29, 
Corporal R.O.T.C. : 



'30; Vice-President. '30; 
Latin Club, '28, '29. 



0. W. Ferrene 

Ch.^tT-^noog.^. Tenn. 
Pi Kappa Alpha 

Freshman Football : Varsity Football, ": 
Sergeant R.O.T.C. 



!9, '30 ; First 



J. F. FORTSON 

Lincolnton. G\. 

-ilpha Lambda Tau 

Freshman Football ; Varsity Football, '30 ; Varsity 
Hosing, '30. 




li 



1930 




Page One Hundred One 



880 




W. H. GOSNELL 

Laurens, S. C. 

Alpha Lambda Tau 

Freshman Basketball, Freshman Track, Varsity 
Basketball, 29, '30 : Varsity Track, 29, '30 ; Cor- 
poral R.O.T.C. 

J. B. Green, Jr. 

Decatlr. Ga. 

Beta Kappa. Sigma Kappa Alpha. I.R.C. 

Freshman Football. Freshman Track. Varsity Foot- 
ball. ■2!l. '30: Varsity Basketball. '29, '30; Var- 
sity Track, '29 : Alternate Captain-Elect Football, 
'31: Secretary and Treasurer Student Body. '30; 
Student Council, '28, '29. '30 : Sergeant R.O.T.C. ; 
"PaC SaC " Staff. 

J. A. Hamlin 

Clinton. S. C. 
(■hi Beta Phi. Lambda Phi Gamma 

■KUie Stocking" Staff. '30: O.-chestra ; Sergeant 
R.O.T.C. 

C. B. Holland 
Clinton, S. C. 

H. D. Jackson 

Greenville. S. C. 

Kappa .4lpha 

Corporal R.O.T.C: Entered from Citadel, '29. 

G. A. James 

Union. .S. C. 

Beta Kappa 

Treasurer Sophomore Class, Assistant Manager 
Football, '29 : Freshman Manager, *30. 

T. M. Johnston 

Jeffebson, Ga. 

Alpha Lambda Tau, Pi Kappa Delta, I.R.C. 

Freshman Baseball ; Tennis Team, '29 : Student 
Council '30 : Dramatic Club. President. '30 : His- 
torian .Junior Class. State Oratiirical Contest, '29; 
Varsity Debating Team, '29. '30; Ministerial Club; 
Block "P" Club. 

H. P. Jones 

Clinton, S. C. 

Pi Kappa Alpha 

Corporal R.O.T.C, "PaC SaC " Staff, '30. 



Page One Hundred Two 



ti 



930 




880 



W. B. Ketchum 
Ariton, Ala. 

Freshman Basketball, Freshman Track, Varsity 

Tiack, -i9, '30; Literary Society, '28, '29, '3:1; 

Ministerial Club; Block "P" Ciub. 

J. R. Kennedy 

York, S. C. 

Pi Kappa Flu, Sigma Upsilon 

Manaijer Freshman Track, '30; Secretary Frcihm:in 
Class, Secretary Sophomore Class, "Blue Stock- 
ing Stair, '28, 29; Business Manager. '30; Col- 
legian Staff. '2.^, '29, '30 ; Y.M.C.A. Cabinet. '30 ; 
P-esident Eukosmian Literary Society. '29 ; Li- 
brary Assistant, '30 ; Coriioral. R.O.T.C. 

R. F. Lawson 

Clinton, S. C. 

Freshman Baseball. 

R. M. Lynn 

Clinton, S. C. 

Pi Kappa Alpha, l.R.C. 

Freshman Football. Freshman Baske'.ball. Frc h 
man T.ack, Varsity Foo ball. '29, '33; Cainain- 
elect, '31, Varsity Ba~.eball, '29; Varsily Ba kct 
ball, '30; Treasurer State Oratorical Aisociatiin. 
President .lunior Class, First Sergeant R O.T C. 

D. M. McDonald 

Great Falls, S. C. 

Fn.vliall Siiiiad. '29; Literary Society. '28: Cor- 
poral R.O.T.C. 

J. M. Macfie 

WiNNSBORO, S. C. 

Kappa Alpha 

Corporal R.O.T.C. 



A. H. McQueen 

MULLINS, S. C. 

Alpha Kappa Pi 



Freshman Football, F.eshman Basketball. Fresh- 
man Track, Varsity Football. '29, '30 ; Varsity 
Bo\ing, '29. '30 ; Varsi'y Baseball, '29 ; Captain- 
elect Boxing, '31 ; Ministerial Club, Se geant 
R.O.T.C. 

R. P. Moore 

Laurens, S. C. 

Alpha Lambda Tau, Chi Beta Phi 

Entered School, '30. 




ti 



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Page One Hundred Three 



880 




R. L. Odiorne 
Clinton, S. C. 

Corporal R.O.T.C. 

G. G. Palmer 

RiDCEWAY. S. C. 
Pi Kappa Delta, Gamma Sigma 

■■Blue Slocking" Staff, '29. '30 : Collegian Staff. 

'30 ; Freshman Debating Team. Varsity Debating 

Team, '29, 'SO. 



W. L. Plaxico 

Sharon, S. C. 

Sigma Kappa Alpha 

•2S : ■■Blue Stocking'^ Staff, ^29; Li- 
Assistant, '30 ; Sergeant R.O.T.C. 



Latin Club 
brary 



G. L. Riddle 
Clover, S. C. 

.\linisli-rial Club: Corporal R.O.T.C: Entered 
School. '30. 

R. D. Ritchie 

Greenville. S. C. 

Beta Kappa, Lambda Phi Gamma 

Freshman Football, Freshman Track, Varsity Foot- 
ball. ^29, '30 ; Varsity Track. '29. '30 : Rifle Team, 
'29, '30: Secretary and Treasurer .lunior Class; 
Secretary and Treasurer Athletic Council : Or- 
chestra : First Sergeant R.O.T.C. 

F. D. Rogers 

Bennettsville, S. C. 

Beta Kappa 

Freshman Baseball. Head Cheer Leader, Pan- 
Hellenic Council. 

M. P. Sherard 

Anderson, S. C. 

Beta Kappa 

Cheer Leader. '29, '30 ; Sergeant R.O.T.C. 

C. W. Sessions 

McClellanville, S. C. 

Pi Kappa Alpha (Pledge) 

Literary Society. '29 ; Freshman Baseball. Minis- 
terial Club. Cheer Leader, '28, '29, '30 ; President 
Latin Club, '29 : Manager Freshman Basketball, 
'30; "PaC-SaC" Staff. '30. 



Page One Hundred Four 



li 



1930 



fk 



880 



S. M. Sims, Jr. 
Chester, S. C. 

Pi Kappa Phi 

•Blue .'Stocking" .Staflf, '29. 



M. P. Snipes 
McRae, Ga. 

Freshman BaskethaU. Varsity Basketball. '29. '30 ; 

Freshman Debating Team. Varsity Debating Team. 

■30: Latin Club. Literary Society. '28, '29, '30; 

Ministerial Club. 



F. R. Stallworth 
Woodruff, S. C. 

Pi Kappa Phi, Lambda Phi Gamma 
Glee Club and Orchestra. '28, '29. 

C. G. Sullivan 

Laurens, S. C. 

D. S. Templeton 

OWINCS, S. C. 

Freshman Basketball, Freshman Baseball, Fresh- 
man Track, Varsity Track, '29, '30 ; Varsity Foot- 
ball, '29 : Literary Society, '28. 



N. E. Truesdell 
Bethune. S. C. 

Alpha Lambda Tau 

Freshman Track. Varsity Track, '29 : Boxing Team, 
■29. '30 ; Captain, '30 : Block "P" Club. 



J. W. Walkup 

Waxhaw, N. C. 

Sigma Kappa Alpha 
Ministerial Club. 



G. A. Weathers 
Gray Court, S. C. 

Literary Society, '28 ; Corporal R.O.T.C. 




« 



1930 



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Page One Hundred Five 



880 




A. R. Wham 

Fountain Inn, S. C. 
Varsity Track, '29. 

A. K. Wyatt 

Chickamauga, Ga. 

Pi Kappa Alpha, Sigma Kappa Alpha 

I-'TL'shnian Basketball, Freshman Track, Varsity 
Basketball, '29, '30 ; Varsity Track, '29, '30 ; Cor- 
poral R.O.T.C. 

E. H. Wyatt 

Chickamauga, Ga. 

Pi Kappa Alpha, Chi BeUi Phi 

rre->hnian Basketball, Freshman Track. Varsity 

I!a .Ketliall, '29; Varsity Track. '29, '30: Literary 

Society, 'i.S. 

B. R. Young 

Cr.ZSTEWOODE, N. Y. 

Society, '28. 

// Kd/ipa Phi, Sigma L'p;ilon. Gamma Sigma, 

Sigma Kappa Alpha 

Freshman Football, Captain Fieshman Baseball. 
"29. '30: Treasurer Freshman Class, Pre;ident 
Sophomore Class, Student Council. '30 : Secretary 
Sisma Upsilon. Secretary Gamma Sigma, Sergeant 
R.O.T.C. 



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Pagf One Hundred Six 



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« 



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Page One Hundred Seven 



880 




W. J. Collins 
President 



Sophomore^ Qlass '^Poenru 

<*' <$> 

'Tis funny what changes a feir months can bring. 
'Tis funny how wise in that lime one can grow. 
Last year we were Freshmen, no! knowing a thing: 
Today there is little that ne do not know. 

We laugh at the Freshjucin. amused at him. 
Tis hard to believe we were ever such clowns. 
We' re really not angry when paddles we trim. 
Though often our faces are darkened with frowns. 

The erudite Junior we cannot but scorn. 
He feels his importance, 'tis easy to see. 
Day in and day out he is looting his horn. 
Pretending thai he's more important than we. 

The Senior ire lake as a matter of course. 

And all the advice that he freely bestows 

Is nothing but wind, though he talks himself hoarse. 

Mere bunt: ihal from Seniors most iiuently flows. 

We're Sophomores now. and there's no more to learn. 
And yet we to fate most resignedly bow. 
.■ind hang around college with two years to burn. 
And wait for the sheep-skin that we deserve now. 



Page One Hundred Eiglit 



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Sophomore^ Qlass history 

By G. C. Adams 

T ^ ISTORY is a success in so far as it reveals the spirit of the times. As times 
^ I I change, so classes change, and as classes change, so the spirit of times 
1^ L changes; and tlie spirit of today is vastly difl'erent from the spirit a year 
ago. Ah! how good it feels to be a Sophomore! Or rather not to be a 
Freshman. After experiencing the very trying ordeal of upholiling the honor of 
contumacious subjection for a year, we have entered the blissful realm of Sopliomore 
lordship. 

On returning, under bright cerulean skies, to the campus last fall to begin a 
second year of worthy history, everything seemed in a state of abstruse tranquillity 
until the Sophs began to meet each other. After a good "hug and howdy" all 
around, we took, to look about us and lo! to our astonishment what do you think 
marred the beauty of the scenery? Rats, rats!! — a regular bevy continually coming 
in. Several rather casual glances were cast among the fellows. But glance swas not 
the termination for "rat extermators" were quickly on the unfortunate prey. An 
elaborate reception was planned for these audacious intruders; needless to say, it 
proved to be a very impressive procedure. 

The Sophomore Class has a rather unenviable rating as one of Utile niemerical 
strength, but quantity is helpless when pitted against quality. Honey is sweetest 
when in small amounts, you know. The present Jimior Class ex els in numbers; but 
as the name Junior actually implies, they are a collection of infants and yet have an 
abundance to learn. The Seniors are only just bearers of that title; and they assume 
a bombastic air of extreme dignity to show their class rank, though underneath the 
exterior there is doubtless a bacchanalian nature. The Freshmen— well. I will not 
say. Many pardons for deserting the original subject, but I was led astray by 
abstract thoughts. 

There is no phase of life within our college walls which does not receive our 
loyal and willing support. In all societies and organizations, religious and social, 
we indubitability have strong representation. 

Upon the athletic "field of battle" the class has made an excellent record. In 
the world of basketball and track several of our members have proved their aptitude 
and endurance; and from every indication the class has material of indispensable 
value amid the accomplishments upon the diamond. 

In the completion of this second annual of collegiate pursuits, the class is proud 
of her attainments, her capabilities, and her prospects. Her attainments as a Fresh- 
man organization form a record of which we may be justly proud. Her capabilities, 
as one of the most determined Sophomore Classes yet seen form a fitting basis for 
unlimited pride and undying loyality. And her prospects — Ah! Who can tell what 
spark of genius she may enkindle within her midst, lit by glowing ambition and avid 
desire of proving full worthy and lastingly appreciative of the noble reputation of 
our beloved Alma Mater? The coming years, although transcendental, loom up in 
the distance as a further insight into those pursuits wliich offer the nobler and better 
ideals of life. 

Therefore, farewell, good past; welcome, ye present, and right well, future, 
do we anticipate thee. 



Cd 



930 



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Page One Hundred Nine 



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E. C. ABERCROMBIE 
Laurens, S. C. 



R. A. ABRAMS 

Clintiin. S. C. 



G. C. ADAMS 

Pi Kappa Phi 

South Boston. \ a. 



C. W. ANDERSON 
Clinton. S. C. 



E. \. ANDERSON 

Alphti Liimbilu Tail 

Laurenceville. Ga. 



M. A. BENNETT 

Alpha Kappa Pi 

Clinton. S. C. 



A. B. BLAKELY 

Ilela Kappa (Pledge) 
Clinton. S. C. 



I!. II. novD 

\ll. l'l.-asant. S. C. 



li 



1930 



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Prise One lliinihed Ten 



880 



T. L. BOYD 
Clray Court, S. C. 



F. L. BRIGMAN 
Wisacky, S. C. 



D. E. BROWN 
Laurens. S. C. 



J. M. BURDETTE 
Linculiilon. Ga. 



G. V. BURNS 
Rock Hill. S. C. 



R. E. CAROTHERS 
Fort Mills, S. C. 



M. P. CASKEY 

Alpha Kappa Pi 

Wichita Falls, Texas 



J. A. CHEATHAM 
Abbeville, S. C. 




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Page One Hundred Eleven 



880 




W. J. COLLINS 
Chester, S. C. 



H. A. COPELAND 
Clinton. S. C. 



W. E. CROUCH 
Charleston, S. C. 



J. M. DEMPSEY 
Fayetteville, N. C. 



W. S. DENSON 
Clinton, S. C. 



B. B. DLNLAP 

Kappa Alpha 
Rock Hill. S. C. 



R. M. E\"ANS 
Summerville, S. C. 



A. D. FERGUSON 

Alpha Lambda Tau 

West Point. Ga. 



Page One Hundred Tuelve 



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880 



R. B. FERGUSON 

Renno. S. C. 



W. P. FERGUSON 

Alpha Lambda Tau 

Sharon. S. C. 



J. A. GALLO\^AY 
Clinton, S. C. 



R. H. GILLESPIE 
Bela Kappa 
Decatur, Ga. 



K. L. HAMILTON 
Spartanburg, S. C. 



J. L. HARDEN 

Beta Kappa 
Anderson, S. C. 



J. W. HEETH 
Quitman, Ga. 



L. C. JACKSON 

Alpha Lambda Tau 

Marion, Ala. 




Cil 



1930 



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Page One Hundred Thirteen 



880 




S. W. KLUTTZ 
Chester, S. C. 



W. M. McCRARY 

Beta Kappa (Pledge) 

Clinton, S. C. 



R. L. McLAUREN 

Alpha Kappa Pi 

Little Rock. S. C. 



D. M. McNAULL 

Beta Kappa 

Columbia. S. C. 



T. A. McLENDON 
Bennettsville. S. C. 



R. R. MARTIN 
Laurens, S. C. 



M. T. MURPHY 
Alpha Lambda Tau 
Chattanooga, Tenn. 



J. H. MYERS, Jr. 
Seneca, S. C. 



Pane One Hundred Fourteen 



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880 



C. M. PLOWDEN 
St. Charles, S. C. 



F. N. ROPER 
Laurens, S. C. 



W. R. SENTER 

Pi Kappa Alpha 

Chattanooga. Tenn. 



R. L. SLMPSON 
Piedmont, S. C. 



W. E. SIMPSON 

Beta Kappa 
Darlington. S. C. 



D. S. SHAW 
Honea Path. S. C. 



G. K. SMITH 
Clinton. S. C. 



L. B. STEPHENSON 
Hartsville, S. C. 








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Page One Hundred Fifteen 



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J. K. TAYLOR 
Laurens, S. C. 



JUNE TRUESDALE 

Pi Kappa Alpha (Pledge) 
Bethune. S. C. 



H. H. WELCH 
Pi Kappa Alpha 
Charleston. S. C. 



V. S. ISHITE 
Fort Payne, Ala. 



J. yi. WHITSETT 
Alpha Kappa Pi 
Charleston, S. C. 



A. W. WILLIAMS 

Fayetteville, N. C. 



B. F. WYMAN 

Pi Kappa Phi 
Aiken, S. C. 



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Page One Hundred Sixteen 



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e^st!^ 







1930 



>^ 



Page One Hundred Seventeen 



880 




J. E. Graham 

President 



^^reshmaru Qlass Toe)rL> 

<$> ^ 

From miles around we came 

To college at old P. C. 

And the honor of her name. 

Links the Class of '33: 

To the truest form of college life. 

And this class will e'er be true. 

So fill your cup, here's life and luck, 

'33, to you. 

We wear our Freshman raps. 

Enter into all the fun : 

Generously hand out matches. 

And wait for our lime to come. 

Our lime is not so far atvay. 

And we'll regret when we are through. 

So fill your stein, here's beer and wine, 

O '33, to you. 

Freshmen ! Freshmen ! 

Thy glory we forecast: 

And pledge a loyalty to you. 

That shall forever last. 

And after we have finished. 

We'll honor the Garnet and Blue. 

So fill your cup, here's life and luck, 

'33, to you. 



—Poet, '1^3 



t\ 



1930 




I'age One lliindretl Eighteen 



880 



L. S. ABRAMS 
Clinton, S. C. 

W. G. ADAIR 

Alpha Kappa Pi 

Clinton, S. C. 

C. W. ADAMS 

Pi Kappa Phi 

Charleston. S. C. 

C. J. BARRETT 

Pi Kappa Phi (Pledge) 

Barboursville, W. Va. 

N. G. BARRON 
Columbia. S. C. 

P. B. BO BO 

Clinton. S. C. 

C. E. BRAGG 

Clinton. S. C. 

R. F. BROWN 

Pi Kappa Alpha 

Black Mountain, N. C. 

H. C. CARPENTER 
Decatur, Ala. 

W. H. CARR 

Kappa Alpha 

Spartanburg. S. C. 

S. L. CLARK 
Pi. Kappa Alpha 

p:stiii. s. c. 

J. B. COPELAND 
Alpha Kappa Pi /Pledge) 
Spartanburg. S. C. 

S. B. W. COURTNEY 
Lake City, S. C. 

B. W. COVINGTON 
Pi Kappa Phi - 
Florence. S. C. 

R. E. CROFTON 
Memphis, Tenn. 




930 



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Page One Hundred Nineteen 



880 




m^^ 



k 




J. F. DAVIS 

Alpha Kappa Pi 

Clinton, S. C. 

J. N. DENDY 

Alpha Lambda Tau 

Walhalla. S. C. 

J. W. DILLARD 
Pi Kappa Phi 
Clinton, S. C. 

G. S. DOMINICK 
Clinton. S. C. 

H. S. ELLIOTT 

Pi Kappa Alpha 

LaGrange, Ga. 

T. P. EVANS 
Bennettsville, S. C. 

G. E. EWING 

Pi Kappa Alpha 

Waycross, Ga. 

H. H. Ferguson 

Kappa Alpha 

York. S. C. 

J. G. FRAMPTON 

Pi Kappa Phi 
Mt. Pleasant, .S. C. 

C. C. GODWIN 
Shipley, Fla. 

L. C. GOOD 

Sharon. S. C. 

BOTHWELL GRAHAM 

Pi Kappa Alpha 

Clinton, S. C. 

J. E. GRAHAM 

llpha Lambda Tau (Pledge) 
Clinton, S. C. 

L. L. GRAY 

.\nderson. S. C. 

J. E. GREER 
Greer, S. C. 



« 



930 




I'agv One Hundred Twenty 



880 



C. H. HAMER 
Dillon, S. C. 

P. B. HARRIS 

Beta Kappa (Pledge) 

Anderson, S. C. 

L. N. HENDERSON 
Clinton, S. C. 

HUNT HOLMES 

Pi Kappa Alpha 

Moultrie, Ga. 

J. R. HORTON 
Mounlville, S. C. 

H. H, HUNTER 
I'i Kappa Phi 
Laurens, S. C. 

H. C. JOHNSON 
Kinards, S. C. 

C. H. LAND 
Clinton, S. C. 

R. B. LESESNE 
Greelyville, S. C. 

H. R. LOCKMAN 

Alpha Kappa Pi (Pledge) 

Clinton, S. C. 

B. A. LOWRY 

Alpha Lambda Tau (Pledge) 

Seneca, S. C. 

J. C. McCASKlLL 

Pi Kappa Phi 
Liberty Hill. S. C. 

J. W. McCUTCHEN 
St. Charles, S. C. 

C. W. McDANIEL 
Thomaston, Ga. 

G. H. MONTGOMERY 
Bishopville, S. C, 




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Page One Hundred Twenty-one 



880 




H. J. MONTGOMERY 
Bishopville, S. C. 

W. H. NEEL 
Newberry, S. C. 

J. T. NEELY 

Kappa Alpha 

Rock Hill. S. C. 

H. L. NETTLES 
Pi Kappa Phi 
Florence. S. C. 

J. \^. ODIORNE 

Clinton. S. C. 

J. E. OSMAN 

Pi Kappa Alpha 
Brazil. Ind. 

F. B. PARKER 

Alpha Kappa Pi (Pledge) 

Macon. Ga. 

L. M. PERRIN 

Beta Kappa (Pledge) 

Abbeville. S. C. 

W. R. PERRY 

Pi Kappa Alpha 

Kershaw, S. C. 

F. B. PINSON 
Pi Kappa Phi 
Conestee, S. C. 

J. D. POLLITZER 

Bela Kappa 

Beaufort. S. C. 

N. G. QLANTZ 

Kappa Alpha 
Rock Hill. S. C. 

R. W. RAMPEY 

Bela Kappa 

Clinton, S. C. 

A. E. RANEY 
Beaufort, S. C. 

W. \I. R.\NSOM 
.\linlo. Ga. 



Page One Hundred Tuenly-livo 



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880 



W. D. REEDER 
West Union, S. C. 

0. A. RICE 
Lancaster, S. C. 

G. D. ROBERTSON 

Rowland. N. C. 

HOWARD STAMPS 
Beta Kappa 
Atlanta. Ga. 

E. J. STEELE 

Alpha Lambda Tau (Pledge) 

Lafayette, Ga. 

J. G. STEELE 
Waxhaw, N. C. 

C. C. STREET 
Roan Mountain. Tenn. 

W. H. TOUCH BERRY 

Greelyville, S. C. 

D. M. UPSHUR 

Alpha Lambda Tau (Pledge) 

Sumter, S. C. 

R. A .WASSON 
Laurens, S.C. 

S. P. WATSON 

Kappa Alpha (Pledge) 

Conway, S. C. 

M. B. WHITE 
Osceala. S. C. 

W. M. WHITE 
Alpha Kappa Pi 
Rock Hill. S. C. 

L. S. WILSON 
Lancaster, S. C. 

L. H. WINTER 
Pi Kappa Phi 

Mobile. Ala. 




1930 



^> 



Page One Hundred Tuenty-three 



880 




J. O. WOODS 

Kappa Alpha 
Chester, S. C. 

A. L. WOODSIDE 

Kappa Alpha 
Greenville. S. C. 

R. L. WYLIE 
Kappa Alpha 
Clover, S. C. 



'freshman Qlass history 



<s> <$> 



By J. E. OSMAN 

/" A S VOYAGERS intn strange lands, we the Class of "33 were launched upon a new sea in 
I A\ the world of life, when we came to Presbyterian College. \^ e embarked one rainy 
^Z_^\ .^-eptember night, on this voyage aboard the good old ship P. C. The veterans aboard 
f J^ the old training ship staged a rat run for our benefit, and the rats ran, all kinds of 
rats, rustic rats, city rats, and wharf rats. The rats will long remember that run. It 
was the first baptism of fire, and marked the entrance into a hectic life aboard ship. A hectic 
life, and a hard one; but the making of real men. 

Then came days of clear skies with fine sailing, and we all moved along in tine style. As the 
cool autumn days moved along. Bill Can- led his football charges through an undefeated season, 
and claimed the title for the charted sea of South Carolina. 

Came January, and we reached the equator on the voyage. Here a terrific hurricane blew up. 
and tossed nur craft about with fatal results to some easy going sailor lads ot the upper decks, as 
well as the lower. After the stcirm had lulled, and noses counted, it was found that things weren't 
as bad as was expected. ^ el fond parents waiting at the home pier got some serious shocks at 
this time. The sto.rm lulled, and quiet reigned aboard ship. 

The basketball team came through in fine style against neighboring crafts, and gave the old 
veterans aboard ship many a bi)lhersome hour of scrimmage. 

A phenomonon nf interrsi was the unusual snowstorm suffered just after crossing the equator. 
What a time was had by all. 

The days pas.sed, and the good old ship P. C. sailed on across the sea of life carrying her 
charges along to new adventures, and new lands of interest. 

Came the final weeks of the c'uise with the course set for home. Full sail, ahead! Was the 
word. an<l all hand~ bent lo the final sweep with a rather saddened head. A few clashes with 
neighbi>ring craft and the track resulted in the good ship P. C. forcing the hostile craft to lower 
their Hags. 

The final miles are here, the dim horizon of land is visioneil afar. Hefore we can safely weather 
another storm, as great as the one on the equator blows up: hit the sailors, veterans all now ride 
her head on. We ride the storm out. The rocks are cheated of their prey. The sea calms. The 
home port looms to the starboard. The voyage is over, our friends greet us at the pier. 

Then comes summer days, when we can revel in the past, and dream of the future. We await 
our emiiardation on the next years voyage aboard the goodly ship, and true. Presbyterian Ccdlege, 
with joy and anticipation. W e'll be veterans then, and do things for P. C.'s glory. 



Page One Uiinilnd Tiirnly-jour 



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W. A. JOHNSON 

Director of Athletics 



Cojich Walter Johnson, loved, feared, and resiiet-ted lliroughout South Carolina ami the South is the 
man who puts on the field well coached teams : the man who has friends in every section of this State be- 
cause he teaches his boys to fight hard and to fight clean. 

To Coach Johnson belongs the honor of bringing athletics at Presbyterian College to its present level. 
Also through his untiring elTorts Presbyteritn College has an athletic plant that compares favorably with 
any University in the South. And in taking advantage of Iliis plant Johnson, in the past few years, in- 
stituted several new sports so that now he probably coaches more sports than any other coach in South 
Carolina. 

The graduates of Presbyterian College leave with the friendship of this man whom they love and 
respect, and later when they read of his achievements they tingle with pride at the success of their beloved 
friend. 

L. S. McMILLIAN 
Freshman Coach 

Lonnie came here as a Freslinian tlie same year tliat Walter Johnson came here as Coach. Tliis wa.s 
indeed a momentous year for P. C. to get two jewels so bright and rare. For indeed, Coacli "M;k-" is a 
peer among coaches. At preparing first year men for the varsity he is unexc^dled. lurning men over to 
Coach Johnson who have improved marveloiisly even in the short time of one year. 

All of Mr. "Mac's" teams are noted for their fighting ability but especially is he noted for his 
Freshmen Football Teams and Varsity Track Teams. The Freshmen have always had winning Football 
Teams and llie Varsity Track Team has won the S.I. A. A. Track Meet twice. 

The name of Lonnie McMillian will never be without honor among graduates of Presbyterian College. 

H. L. EICHELBERGER 

Assistant Football Coach 

"Eich" came back to his old Alma Mater in a time of need. While the other coaches had their 
hands full "Eicli" look charge of the line. "Eich" is remembered as one of the fiercest tackles ever pro- 
duced in this State. He and Mr. "Mac" made "All-State" when they played on Coach Johnson's famous 
Football Team of 1919. P. C. is very fortunate indeed to have so valuable a man as "Eich" on the Coaching 
Staff. 



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Page One Hundred Twenty-five 



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p 




< 
2 

s 
o 

in 

u 
z 



en 



o 






880 




(^Athletic oTKtanagers 

C. S. RiGBY I arsily Football 

D. D. Beckman Varsity Basketball 

L. C. Jackson / 'arsiiy Boxing 

S. G. Stukes Varsity Baseball 

E. L. Jackson / ursiiy Track 



Page Onr lliimlrnl Tnciily-right 



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880 



FOOTBALL 

1930 



"Dill" Beckman 
Captain 





.^^^m^M^.^^ 



^%Jfi>*^:» 




Liu'^^"^ 



--t, 



THE VARSITY SQUAD 



u 



1930 



^> 



Page One Hundred Twenty-nine 



880 




ROSS LYNN, End 
In Ross, P. C. had its only all state man this year. Captain-elect for next sea- 
son and one of the most valuable men around which the squad will be iiuilt. Lvnn is 
outstanding in both offense and defensive play. He is one of the best ends that has 
played for the Blue Stockings and much is expected from him next season. 

ASHBY GALLOWAY, Halfback 
When triple threat men are mentioned, one thinks of "Skeet". He is fast, 
shifty, and a heady half; passes with either hand and is a good kicker as well as 
dependable for gains in a pinch. In the Erskine game Gallowav received an injury 
which kept him out the rest of the season. 

GUS BLAKELY, Tackle 
A fierce, hard hitting tackle that struck terror in the hearts of the opponets. Gus 
is a clean, hard fighter, plays an aggressive game and is always dependable when 
a hole through the other line is needed. When bigger and belter tackles are made, 
Gus will still be the best. 

JIMMIE GREEN, Quarterback 
Little, but fast and elusive. Here he comes and there he goes; that's Jimmie 
Green! He runs the team, kicks, passes, and when he carries the ball, P. C. can be 
sure of a good gain. Jimmie is one of the oustanding backs in the state. Several times 
last season he ran through tlie entire line for a touchdown. This is his third year. 



f' ^■^H t- 



?■ ..•rSh'. ■'^In.' '^^ • \' 



/'age Onr lliimlml Tliirly 



1930 



^> 



880 




ARCHIE CHEATHAM. Tackle 
Archie is the Bhie Stockings' other mighty tackle. With his size and weight it 
was indeed an optimistic opponent that attempted to pass through his side of the line. 
One of the main stays in the line this season and with two more years of football 
ahead, he should make an enviable record before graduation. 

OTTO FERRENE, End 
P. C. has always been noted for her big, little men. Such is Otto. Many a 
heavy back has run around the wings of the P. C. team only to be met by Otto; and 
the man stops there, too. For the past. two years he has been on the job and next 
year should reach even greater football heights. 

A. H. McQueen, Guard 

Full of fight and never knowing when he is licked expresses "Mac's" work on 
the football team. He is one of the hardest fighting guards that has ever represented 
the Hose on the grid and is expected to fill a big place in making ne.xt year's line 
one of the best. 

A. 0. DUNLAP, Fullback 

Snooks was the truck horse for the Hose backfield this season. Upon him de- 
pended most of the line plunging as well as stopping the rushes of the opposing teams. 
He did this well as is shown by some of the scores against teams he played. Wlien it 
came to hitting the line, Snooks was called on and always came through with the 
goods. He has one more vear at P. C. 




1930 



Page One Hundred Thirty-one 



880 




D. M. McNAULL, Center 

Upon "Mac" fell the job of passing the ball back as well as holding his portion 
of the line. This was his first year at this i)osition but he filled the bill like a veteran. 
MtNauU played more than any man on the team and had a most successful season. 
He is a Soph, which insures P. C. of a good center for two more years. 

PETE BENNETT, End 

This red haired lad proved to be a streak on the P. C. wing. Pete can snag a 
pass if it is anywhere near him and this he did for many touchdowns during the sea- 
son. On defensive play he is a safe bet and can get his man when the play swings 
around the end. 

J. F. FORTSON, Center 

Fortson can play guard and, if needefl, will fill the position of center equally as 
well. His specialty is getting through the line and nabbing the runner before the 
line of scrimmage is reached. A hard lighter and an excellent lineman with one 
more year to make his football record complete at P. C. 

JACK MARTIN. Tackle 

Jack is the lightest tackle on this years squad but to see him in play one could 
not guess it. He stops tlic:n, large or small. This is the last year for Jack and he 
will he missed in the line when the football season rolls around next tall. 

r.-"- 




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XEIL CLINTON, End 

For three years Neil has been pulling for the team an this season is the first as 
a regular. He made good and held his position well in the games he played. Light 
but scrappy, he hit them hard and made P. C. a good end. 

WALTER WALKER, Fullback- 
Speed brought his football career to a close by plowing over the line in the 
Newberry game to score P. C.'s final touchdown. For three years he plugged for a 
place and when he won it, he brought points for the team bv his playing. Rather 
light for fullback, he made up for this deficiency by hard playing. 

BEVERLY YOUNG, Quarterback 

For the past two years "Bevo'' has proved himself an able field general for his 
alma mater. Cool, steady under fire, an elusive ball toter. with plenty of abilitv tells 
the story of Beverly's football for this season. His unfortunate injury at mid sea- 
son kept him from greater fame of the field. 

R. D. RITCHIE, Halfback 

With every game Bobby gets better. Look out for him next year. The fast- 
est man on the team and a deadly pass snagger which will make him a dangerous 
rival and threat throughout the game. Once given a foot start he cannot be caught. 




1930 




Page One Hundred Thirty-three 



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J. E. MEANS, End 

While "Red" did not get in the game much this season it was not because he did 
not ]3uli for the team. Every vear found "Red" in uniform when the call for foot- 
liall candidates went out and he played the game at all times with all he had and for 
the glory of P. C. with no thought for himself. 

B. B. DUNLAP, Halfback 

Bernie hit his stride in the latter part of the season. Although one of the light- 
est men on the team he could hit a line as many twice his size did. Elusive, fast on 
his feet, and a man that played "heads up" ball at all times. He is dynamite on the 
field and with two more years is sure to make an enviable record. 

BILL SENTER. Quarlerback 

Bill is e(]ually proficient at quarter and half. He is small. Init oli. so fast and 
elusive. One can get hands on him but still Bill gets away for more yardage. He is 
also a good punter and will see much service next season. This is his Soph year 
at P. C. 

K. L. HAMILTON, Guard 

"Butterfly" is determined to make himself a good guard and tlial goal he has 
reached. He is a consistant plugger and has shown consiilerabie improvement dur- 
ing the past season. He will make a dependable lineman next iall and. as this is 
his second year he has some time to play lor the Hose. 






E^iri^'T): o^^- Iks 



'.fssssr.'^'jy,', 




Page One lluiulnd Thirtyjuitr 



1930 




880 



cA '^sume^ of the^ ^lue^ Stocl^ng 
football ^ea^oTLo 

^ I HE BLUE HOSE opened their 1930 football season with a 15 to 
>J I victory over the Lenoir-Rhyne Bears. Lenoir-Rhyne couldn't 
I withstand the Presbyterians' deadly aerial attack and the fast end 
^y runs of Jinuuy Green. 

One week later the Presbyterian Blue Hose, smarting under the 7 to 6 
defeat that Mercer gave them last year, sought revenge. And revengence was 
theirs as the flying feet of Orell Dunlap dashed down Johnson field behind 
perfect interference for 67 yards and a Presbyterian victory over Mercer. 
Much credit for this score must go to Green who clipped Alderman as he 
reached for the elusive Dunlap and to Galloway who spilled the Mercer 
safety, Matt. The Blue Hose forward wall played like heroes, led by Cap- 
tain Dill Beckman, Gus Blakely and Ross Lynn. They repulsed brilliant 
Mercer attacks that seemed destined to score at least four times. It was 
a great victory over a worthy foe. 

On October 11, the Blue Hose went to Greenville to entertain Furman's 
Purple Hurricane on their field. Walter Johnson's speedy Presbyterian 
eleven held the Hurricane scoreless in the first half but lost, after a magnif- 
icent struggle against odds in the latter half, 12 to 0. Furman's first touch- 
down was handed them almost on a silver platter, as their end broke through 
to block a punt behind P. C.'s own goal line and fell on the bounding 
oval for a touchdown. The game was marked by miusual roughness, for 
which Furman was penalized more than 50 yards. 

The Blue Hose linesmen withstood such a pounding in the Furman 
game that it was unable to cope with the Gamecocks' assaults in the game 
the following week at Columbia. Not only were they crippled in this game 
but they were in bad shape for the next two or three games. Carolina had 
tlie Blue Hose backs covered while their own went on a rampage. Ross 
Lynn and Bennett, Presbyterian wingmen, were the best performers for the 
Blue Hose. 

At Charleston, the Presbyterians presented a stubborn line of big. game 
Scotchmen and a pair of swift, perilous backs who used their might to harass 
and hamper the Citadel Bulldogs for the sake of Presbyterian College but 
the cadets overcame this Calvinist combine to win by 14 to 0. The dashing 
Green, often stopping only after more than one man had hit him, raced 60 
yards once over the goal line after receiving a pmit. It looked like he had 



insBsn 



Page One Hundred Thirty-jive 



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a touclulowii and a hush fell over the Citadel partisans, but the officials ruled 
that he had stepped out of bounds and the ball was brouglit back. The 
Presbyterians left an impression of a tough fight and a threat. 

The Blue Stockings were nosed out by the Wotford Terriers on Novem- 
ber 1, at the Spartanburg County Fair by the score of 13 to 6. The Terriers 
presented two drives that resulted in touchdowns and then settled down on 
die defense. The Blue Hose threatened continually to score but it seemed 
that the breaks were against them. Jimmy Green made one of the most 
spectacular runs of tlie season when he took the ball from a kick off on his 
own ] 4-yard line and raced swiftly through the entire Woflford team for a 
touchdown. 

The Blue Stocking machine, a veritable smouldering volcano, burst 
forth, smothering Erskine's famed Flying Fleet with its fury to the tune of 
44 to 7. It was a great day for the Blue Hose supporters as the flying feet 
of Green. Dunlap and Galloway, ran and slitl through the mud for touch- 
down after touchdown, turning the game into a track meet. The Blue Stock- 
ing line, becoming conscious of its power, reveled in repulsing every attack 
of the Erskine backs. Ross Lynn and "Skeet" Galloway presented as pretty 
an exhibition of hard and accurate tackling as ever seen on a football field. 
The team worked with clock-like precision, every player doing his part. In 
the fourth quarter. Coach Johnson sent in his entire second team and they, 
led by Bernie Dunlap and Bill Senter, continued the savage attack to score 
P. C.'s final touciulown. Thus it was shown to the football fans in the state 
that Presbyterian's potential power had become real power and they were 
playing the class of football that they were capable of. 

The Presbyterians next journeyed to Wake Forest to play the giant Wake 
Forest Deacons, who outweighed the Blue Hose more than ten pounds to the 
man. The battle waged back and forth with neither side being able to score. 
The smashing tackling of the Presbyterians who broke through their heavier 
opponents numerous times, was outstaniling. Blakely and Cheatham showed 
some as pretty tackle play as has been seen in North Carolina Uiis year. 

In their last game of the season, their homecoming battle, and against 
their oldest rivals, Newberry, the Blue Stockings rose to greater heights and 
humbled their opponents by a score of 54 to in a great, hard fought battle. 
To name the stars in this game would be lo call the roll of the Presbyterian 
team, for every man acquitted himself like a hero. P. C.'s line worked 
magnificently. Captain Beckman played his last game for P. C. and played 
a good one. Both Cheatham and Blakely played havoc with Newlierry's 
rushes, while Ross Lymi was down on every punt, in every play and going 
al lop form. Bennett did pretty work, making two touchdowns and blocking 
eiul runs. This was a glorious end to Presbyterian College's foot])all season. 



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football Schedule^ 

for 1930 

<?> <$> 

September 20 Clemson at Clemsoii 

September 27 Mercer at Macon 

October 4 . . . Chattanooga at Chattanooga 

October 9 High Point at Clinton 

October 18 Wofford at Clinton 

October 25 Citadel at Charleston 

November 1 N. C. State at Charlotte 

November 8 Wake Forest at Asheville 

November 15 Erskine at Clinton 

November 27 Newbeny at Newberry 



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'^reshmaru football ^earru 



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Standing (Reading Left to Rigliti — MiMillian iCoachi. Barrett. Adair. 
OsMAN. Graham. Ci-\rke. Holmes. Ewi.ng. Elliott. Barron, Rampey. 

Middle Row — Xettles, Hamer, Pinson, Odigrne, Parker. Stamps, Watson, 
Wilson. Copel-\nd. Perrin. James ( Manager i. 

Bottom Row — Adams. Pollitzer. Lockman. Steele, Graham. Martin, 

Winter, Carr i Captain ) . 



FRESHMAN FOOTBALL SCORES 



P. C. Freshmen 19 

P. C. Freshmen 

P. C. Freshmen 38 

P. C. Freshmen 6 

P. C. Freshmen 52 



\^ offord Freslimen 19 

Carolina Freshmen 

Erskine Freshmen 

Citadel Freshmen 6 

Presbyterian Junior College.. 



Page One Hundred Thirty-eight 



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BASKETBALL 




1930 



"Bob" Caldwell 

Captain 




THE \AU:?1TY SQUAD 



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ROBERTS, Forward 

Fliil is one of the best forwards and sure point makers on the squad. Give him 
the ball anywhere near the basket and he can be depended on for two points. He was 
out the first part of the year from injuries, but before the season was far gone proved 
himself invaluable. 

ADAIR, Forward 

Fbrward is "Mac's" job. He is little but fast and his shooting makes him one 
of P. C.s best scorers. He is all over the floor and hard to guard. A good clean 
basketball player and on the squad since his first year in college. 

CHEATHAM. Guard 

In the history of basketball Cheatham has already, as a guard, made himself 
well known. He plays a daring and consistent game, breaking up much of the op- 
positions offensive plays and breaking through himself for occasional shots at the 
basket. During his next two years he will be in plenty of action and will most prob- 
ably be considered one of the most consistent guards in the State. 

LYNN, Guard 

In the ca])acity of guard. Ross has proved himself a valuable asset to P. C.'s 
basketball team. He was unable to come out last year because of injuries, but this 
season his ability to cover the floor has made him one of I'. C.'s best guards. 



I'tige One Hundred Forty 



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GREEN, Forward 

Green, that "fade away man" of the gridiron has also great ability to jjlay a 
fast, tricky game of basketball. Just when an opponent thinks he has made a suc- 
cessful pass to his team mate "faile awav" springs from some unknown place, inter- 
cepts that pass and like lightning he has tossed the sphere to one of the Blue Hosemen. 

MASON, Guard 

Clinton has produced many great guards who have made themselves known in 
the basketball realm, and the more they come the better they get. Mason is this late 
product and deserves the name ''a real basketball guard." He has given four years 
of merited service in this game and now passes on to sesk fame in the "game of life" 
outside the "college of colleges." 

KEELS, Forward 

In "Shorty" Keels, P. C. has a dependable and formidable forward. To offset 
the disadvantage of stature, he is always alert and quick, both on offense and de- 
fense. Everything considered, "Shorty is one of the surest scores on the squad. 



GOSNELL, Center 

Cosnell as a center has pressed into the ranks of worthy basketball players. He 
plavs a verv smooth game either at a forward or a center position. His long reach 
enables him to tip that sphere just where it should be. and when "Goose" takes a shot 
at the netting the score keeper usually adds two points for the fighting Blue Hose. 



1930 



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DUNLAP. Guard 

Another worthy product of Thornwell Orphanage is Orell Dunlap. Orell plays 
a guard position and is highly commended for his very clever and brainy playing. 
His canny ability is especially displayed in his smooth floor work. Dunlap will 
surely be a "big gun" next year. 

K. WYATT, Forward 

Alternating between forward and center. "Dora" is proficient in either position. 
He is one of the most versatile plaNcrs on the team — a good shot and a good floor 
man. He should aid P. C.'s basketball team materially next year. 



McNAUL. Guard 

McNaul who is only a Sophomore this year will, with a little coaching and ex- 
perience, become the most potent guard in the state. If his capacity be developed his 
name will, without doubt, be placed among those of fame in the archives of basket- 
ball. He handles himself well, has the ability to dribble well, shoots accurately 
and (]uick. and passes with eithef hand in any (lirectioii. 

COPELAND, Center 

When Copeland is in the game, P. C. is always sure of getting the tip-off. This 
young Sophomore, lanky as he is, will be a genuine asset to the team next year. He 
also uses his heiglit as an advantage over his opponents in dropping the ball through 
the net. 



I'agc One Hundred Forly-lwo 



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T. C. basketball 

As Viewed by the Critics 



Basketball Maroons Upset By Blue Hose 

In one of the best games ever seen here 
Presbyterian College upset the dope to win 
over the quintet of the College of Charleston 
by a score of 59 to 50. — The Greenville News. 

P. C. Defeats Newberry 

Captain Caldwell and Mac Adair of the 
Blue Hose Varsity led the way to their team's 
first victory of the season. — The State. 

Rally By P. C. Too Late 

Getting a long lead in the first half and out- 
speeding the upstaters until the last few min- 
utes of play, the College of Charleston de- 
feated the basketeers from Preshyterian Col- 
lege tonight 40 to 33. — The Gretnville News. 

Presbyterians Defeat Maroons 

The Blue Stockings grabbed an early lead, 
which was never overcome hy the Maroons. 
Roherts' excellent shooting featured the first 
half. — The News and Courier. 

Erskine Victor Over Stockings 

Crackerjack game at Clinton last night. 
The contest was a close and rough one, but 
Erskine outpassed the P. C. boys. The game 
may be classed as the best the Blue Stockings 
have played this season. — The .SVn(e. 

Adair Is Star In Sox Defeat 

Leading 17 to 13 at the half, the Presby- 
terians let the Cadets catch up with them early 
in the second and from then on it was a nip 
and luck battle until Citadel bore down in 
the last four minutes to make the game safe. 
— The Greenville News. 

Blue Stockings Defeat Wofford 

Presbyterian College defeated Wofford last 
night in an interesting basketball game. Rob- 
erts and Adair, P. C. forwards, showed up 
best on the floor. — The State. 

Blue Stockings Best Newberry 

Presbyterian College took a scrappy bas- 
ketball game from Newberry last night 38 to 
32. Adair and Caldwell played stellar bas- 
kelhall for the winners. — The Greenville News. 



Citadel Rally Trims Presbyterians 

The going was very fast, with both teams 
using long passes which they hurled with 
much speed and occasionally depending on 
the drihble for the advances. — The News anil 
Courier. 



Hurricane Rallies To Beat Blue Stockings 

Too much praise can not be lavished on the 
Presbyterians for their playing and especially 
what they did in the first half. In the at- 
tack and defense two figures stood out, 
Adair, a forward who made 10 points, and 
Jimmy Green of football and track fame. Gos- 
nell, at center was doing his share. Adair is 
without a doubt one of the cleverest forwards 
in the State and all season has been the main 
cog in the Presbyterian play. — The Greenville 
Neivs. 



Blue Hose Defeat College of Charleston 
at Clinton 

The Presbyterians took an early lead and 
were never threatened seriously. Lynn and 
Cheatham at guards and Roberts at forward, 
were the outstanding players. — The State. 

Cadets Get Early Lead to Defeat P. C. 
51 to 43 

Adair was P. C.'s high scorer with seven 
field goals; many of which were from consid- 
erable distance. Caldwell, also, played fine 
ball. — The News and Courier. 

Erskine At One Time Held a Lead 
Of 14 to 1 

A new team substituted by Coach Johnson 
and led by the accurate shooting of Roberts 
resulted in a score at the end of the half of 
27 to 22 in favor of the Fleet. Through the 
entire last period it was a nip and tuck bat- 
tle. — The Greenville News. 

P. C. Quint Cops Thriller From Newberry 

The 1930 basketball season was closed here 
tonight with the Presbyterian Blue Stockings 
defeating the Newberry Indians, by the score 
of 42 to 35. Roberts, Gosnell and Adair did 
good work for the Blue Stockings. — The State. 



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^reshmaru ^asliethall ^earru 



<$>♦ 



Siantlin^ (Reading Left to Right I — McQuEEN (Manager), Copeland, Steele, 

PiNSON, OSMAN, DiLLARD. BaRRON. NeTTLES. 

Kneeling — Adams (Captain), Stamps, Parker, Graham. Adair, Perrin. 



FRESHMAN BASKETBALL SCORES 



P. C. Freslimen 32 

P. C. Freslimen 27 

P. C. Freshmen 35 

P. C. Freshmen 29 

P. C. Freslimen 4',! 

P. C. Freshmen 52 

P. C. Freshmen 54 

P. C. Freshmen 55 

P. C. Freshmen 52 

P. C. Freshmen 50 

J'. C Freshmen 64 



Wofford Freshmen 37 

All Stars 26 

Newberry Freshmen 33 

Furman Freshmen 38 

Newberry Freshmen 39 

WiifKird Freshmen 30 

WoiHlruir Hijih SeJKicI 17 

Kershaw His;h ScIkiuI 21 

I'.islidinille Hish Sehiinl .... 22 

Elbcrion Hifih Sv\u,<>\ 21 

Anderson Mill 17 



Page One Hundred Forty-jour 



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BOXING 

1930 



"Nubby" Truesdale 

Captain 





THF, \ Alisnv SQUAD 



1930 



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Page One Hundred Forty-five 



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J 



i ...^„ 



B. B. DUNLAP, Fealherweiglit 

Bernie entered llie fistic sport for the first time this year and came nut with flying colors. He 
is another fast and illusive mixer and will probahly make a name for himself in the next two years. 

L. R. WILLIAMSON. Lightweight 

Williamson is another who entered the roped square for the first time this year. He made a 
good showing and it is regrettable that this is his Senior year for he had a bright prospect of be- 
coming a real leather pusher in the future. 

A. H. McQueen iCaptain-Elect), Middleweight 

"Cyclone" who served as alternate-captain this season is one of the two veterans to return to 
the team. He probably had the classiest opposition in the state and through it all he came out 
with a good record. "Mac" packs a terrific blow and should be champion of something next year 
when he serves as Captain. 

A. B. BLAKELY, Jr., Heavyweight 

Big Gus had the same amount of practice and experience that McQueen had when he en- 
gaged in his first battle. He did not win any but it was not because he wasn't giving all he had. 
Gus has fine prospects for his next two years of ring activity. 

J. W. McQueen, Light-heavyweight 

Bill entered the ring against Carolina with no experience and only two days" practice, but 
even under these difficulties, he made a good impression. Fighting under various handicaps the 
wlifde season, he showed that he had the stuff llial goes to make a real man. This is the kind 
of men you hate to see graduate. 

J. F. FORTSON, Welterweight 

Fortson, while getting his first lasle of boxing this year, made a most remarkable showing, 
losing only one of his three scraps and that by a very close margin to Wilson of Carolina. He 
packs a knockout blow in each hand and mucii is expected of him before he graduates in 1931. 



Piige One Hundred Forty-six 



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-88- 

BASEBALL 

1930 



Earl Perry 

Captain 





THE VARSITY SQUAD 



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Page One Hundred Forty-seven 



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HHL L_ji^v ^R^F 



.Vi 




PHIL ROBERTS 

With his cool head work and sure hitting there was no doubt as to who wouhl 
cover short this year. He has played brilliantly for three years and with added con- 
fidence from these successful battles he should make a strong bid for All State this 
season. 

BOBBY CALDWELL 

Bobby has again returned to the diamontl after a prolonged sojourn upon the 
basketball court. His pitching for the last two years has been the mentor of op- 
posing teams, and we feel sure he shall reach even greater heights during the coming 
season. 

"BEVO" YOUNG 

Young is one of the outstanding pitchers of the P. C. club. He has shown hi- 
ability also as a pinch hitter. By the use of his head and slow ball he won several 
close games last year. We expect much of him during the coming season. 

JOE BABB 

Joe came into his own in baseball last year and is sure to be a star this season. 
He is a sure fielder and has an exceptionally strong arm, whipping the ball from the 
outfield 1(1 home jilate as fast as a bullet. 



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RICHARD ODIORNE 

This lean, lithe, hut hardly silent lad adorns tlie hot corner, holding it down in 
splendid fashion. His stickwork is far ahove the average. 

ARCHIE CHEATHAM 

Archie comes up from the Freshmen of last year to fill T. Greene's shoes at the 
initial sack. He is hig enough to fill anybody's shoes and many a pitcher will be 
worried by that healthy swing of his. 

ORELL DUNLAP 

"Chuck-a-Luck" is an old veteran now. having been the tar-bucket in right-field 
last year. Dunlap always rises to the occasion, doing the impossible in both hitting 
and fielding. 

FLEM MASON 

Ossie shags "em anytime, anywhere, and any place. He has saved many games 
by throwing his long, lanky frame into the air to bring down an elusive horsehide 
which seemingly was on the road to a Blue Stocking defeat. 



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_^ ^ ! ■ ., 



iM; 



"STUD" ROGERS 

"Stud" is a verv bright prospect for our team. We are in need of a good man 
for this position and feel that in him we have our need. He is as scrappy a receiver 
as we have. 

ROSS LYNN 

Ross will be cavorting around short-stop again this year. A dependable fielder 
with a strong arm and a mighty wallop. Fans will long remember when Ross "parked" 
the ball in the Newberry game. 

ARLIE WILLIAMS 

Another budding star has peeped from behind the horizon in the shape of a 
stocky little short-stop who "scoops "em up" everywhere. He should go far in base- 
ball circles. 

ARTHUR COPELAND 

This is another promising Sophomore. He is a real hitter and a sure fielder. 
Copeland will make the Blue Hose a valualile man in the future, and the opposition 
will have to watch this Clinton lad. 



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ARTHUR McQueen 

During his Sophomore year, "Mack" was used as a general utility man with a 
wallop. This wallop has been demonstrated on more than one occasion. We look 
for greater things from this boy in the future. 

CHARLIE RIGBY 

Charlie's specialty is the catching department — when it isn't too hot for him to 
get out. Charlie has the ability of a real catcher. This is Charlie's last year. 

J. TRUESDALE 

June is one of our brightest prospects for the team. We feel that he is the long 
sought for man for the keystone position. June will make a fitting running mate 
for Phil Roberts. 

N. TRUESDALE 

This lad is going to make a real fielder. He has a quick throw that beats most 
runners to the base, and at the bat he is a sure hitter. We're expecting great things 
of Nubby in the future. 



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Page One Hundred Fijty-one 



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/*- 




'% 




'S/ic^' Qheer Leaders 



<j> «> 



"Stud" Rogers, Head Leader 
"Red" Ml rphy ■•Mvrsiiall" Sherard 

"Llbie" Sessions "Blnt" Woods 



Page One Itundmd Fijly-tiio 



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TRACK 

1930 



"Red" Means 

Captain 

S.I.A.A. CHAMPIONS 
1929 





THE VARSITY S(JL AU 



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^K§sume^^ of S' 1' <y^' cA. 



♦ <?> 

For the second time in three years the P. C. tracksters merged from the season with the 
highest crown of attainment — the S. I. A. A. Championship. Following a season of success marked 
with only one defeat in a dual contest and second place in the State, the P. C. men played hosts 

to teams representing six states in the Southern Intercollegiate Athletic Association, and closed 

the season by winning. 

Never in the history of the S. I. A. A. has the competition been so close or hard as found in 
Clinton in May. Many schools sent strong teams and with the announcing of the results of each 
event it became more and more uncertain as to the winner, and up to the final event, the relay, 
three schools were so close in points that any one of them winning the relay would be the victor 
in the meet. P. C. had the punch for the final race and won with 29 points against 25 for Miss- 
issippi College. 25 for Oglethorpe, and 19 for Georgetown. 




-■^'i'i 








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m 


m 


01 


^^^^ ''^'^^'■l^^iH 


k ViJL *P. 1 


A "la ifc "^ _ 



To win this outstanding meet for small colleges of the South. P. C. accumulated three firsts, 
one second, four thirds, and three fourth p'aces. Hogrefe won first place in the 100-yard dash and 
broad jump, closing his season with the distinction of being the best track man P. C. ever had. 
The third first place was made by the relay team composed of Green. Wyatt, Hogrefe, and 
Ritchie, who stepped the mile in time far surpassing the state record and within a fraction of the 
S. I. A. A. record of long standing. It was a thrilling race, P. C. barely nosing out Louisiana. 
Pearce, hurdle ace of the Calvanists, won second in the low hurdles to add more tallies to the 
score. Marshall, his running partner, finished third in the same race close on his heels. Green 
finished third in the 100-yard dash and in the broad jump, and Ritchie won third place in the 
220. Ketchum gathered a point in a pretty half-mile race while Templeton tossed the javelin for 
a fourth place. Hogrefe ran the 220 close on the heels of Ritchie for an additional point. 

While the "29 team did not have the record made by the winners at P. C. in "27, they faced 
harder competition in all the season's meets and are deserving of much credit. The loss of four 
members of the team make matters hard for the oncoming squad, but with the usual P. C. spirit 
this year's team is pointing to their third S. I. A. A. Championship. 




^~' - ~ -*^^ 



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Fiigr One Hundred Fijiysix 



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IJarsity Schedule^ 1930 

March 29 Georgia at Athens 

April 1 Davidson at Clinton 

April 5 Carolina at Columbia 

April 12 Tech Relays 

April 19 Emory at Atlanta 

April 26 Furman at Clinton 

May 3 State Meet at Clinton 

May 10 S.I.A.A. at Clinton 




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0\0,^^, f f> f 




^reshmaru ^rack ^eavru 



<$> <s> 



Standing (Left to Right I — McMillian ( Coach t, COURTNEY, OsMAN, MONTGOMERY, 
DiLLARD, EwiNG, Parker, Woods, Carr, Land, KENNEDY (Manager). 

Sitting— PmsoT^, Stamps, Wylie, Pollitzer, B. Graham, 
J. E. Graham, Covington, Montgomery. 



Page One Hundred Fifty-eight 



ti 



930 



^> 



880 




tennis ^earUy 1930 



T. M. Johnson 
W. B. McCall 



Id 



930 



f^ 



Page One Hundred Fijty-nine 



880 







O 



z 






o 

z 



o 
u 

u 

s 

o 

z 
o 

S 

a 
<; 
H 
CD 

>■ 
u 
►J 

< 



« 



1930 



^> 



/'age Oh( lliindrcil Sixty 




ORGANIZATIONS 




f 



>N 



1^ 




STUDENT • >^ 
COINCIL -^ 








Stllejpte Obaltlf Uoutja 

Ja/;ijsi(^^^^M: Cfjeatl)aM Sreer 

OFFICERS 

P. A. Roberts President 

I. M. Keels ; ice-President 

J. B. Green, Jr Secretary-Treasurer 

Page One Hundred Sixty-one 



880 




fant h. thornlev TacScic Staff 

Edilor-in-Chiei "^ ^ JJ 

\^ . T. Barron 4ssistant Editor-in-Chief 

C. \^ . GR-\fton Associate Editor 

A. G. Thornton 4ssociate Editor 

J. F. ODaniel issociate Editor 

R. B. Caldwell ithleiic Editor 

J. B. Green Assistant Athletic Editor 

C. J. ^^\RTIN Organization Editor 

W. B. .McCall Senior Class Editor 

C. W. Sessions Junior Class Editor 

H. P. Jones Photographic Editor 

J. C. Brabham 4rt Editor 

S. G. Stukes Joke Editor 

BUSINESS STAFF 

P: A. Roberts Assistant Business Manager 

I. M. Keels Advertising Manager 

I. M. Adair Assistant Advertising Manager 




R. S. Chauford 

Business Mantiscr 



Page One Hundred Sixly-tuo 



« 



1930 



s% 



880 





'^mli/ja 




P 

SAC 
C 



6tuMe 




loarro/i 



eet; 



/^oier'fs 



/i'Call 



Ccldrreil 





Keels 



Jiarfu, 





'DicKsm/ 




Sraftoi 




Ma 




^daml 





Jljor/itoH 



Se. 



Jones 



t^ 



1930 




Page One Hundred Sixty-three 



880 




C. W. Grafton 

Edilor-in-Chief 



Tlie." ^lue^ Stocking Staff 



0. W. Chapin Managing Editor 

R. T. Gillespie Associate Editor 

L. R. Williamson Associate Editor 

B. H. Dickson Feature Editor 

B. R. Young Varsity Editor 

L. C. Jackson Frosh Sports 

J. I. Copeland Campus Editor 

G. G. Palmer Exchange Editor 

S. M. Sims, Jr Joke Editor 

BUSINESS STAFF 

F. H. Thornley Assistant Business Manager 

A. K. Wyatt Advertising Manager 

W. J. Collins Assistant Advertising Manager 

J. R. Kennedy Circulation Manager 

G. C. Adams Assistant Circulation Manager 

V. S. White Proofreader 




R. S. Crawford 

Business ManngiT 



Page One llundml Si.xl)-lour 



ti 



1930 




880 




iStlli^^pte' 



« 



1930 



OE 



Page One Hundred Sixty-five 



880 




L. R. Williamson 

Editor-in-Chief 



Qollegiaru Staff 



T. G. Ellis Assistant Editor 

J. A. Babb Advertising Manager 

B. H. Dickson C. W. Grafton R. T. Gillespie 0. W. Chapin 

W. C. Dendy J. R. Kennedy J. I. Copeland 

J. S. Dendy G. G. Palmer 




A. 0. Jackson 

Business Manager 



« 



930 




/^/^'(■ (hii- Ihiiiilrrd Sixty-six 



880 




ti 



1930 



l>> 



Page One Hundred Sixty-seven 



880 



^h^ Q/e^ Cluh 

M. C. Dendy Director 

W. C. Dendy President 

J. E. Means Manager 

FIRST TENORS 

J. E. Means H. J. Montgomery 

W. J. McCltcheon C. S. Rigby 

SECOND TENORS 

G. W. EwiNG J. H. Myers W. H. \eel D. M. Upshur 

L. R. Williamson J. O. Woods 

FIRST BASS 
W. C. Dendy C. J. Martin F. B. P.\rker A. E. Raney 

SECOND BASS 

B. V. Burns W. J. Collins J. I. Copeland 

C. H. Montgomery H. H. Welch 

T. P. Evans. Pianist 

J. H. -MvERS. C. W. McDaniel, Comedians 
("Myers and Mack'") 



Page One Hundred Sixty-eight 



ti 



1930 



H^ 




£3 



« 



1930 



Oe 



fage One Hundred Sixty-nine 



880 



^he^ Orchestra 

W. C. Dendy Director 

A. E. Raney Assistant 

W. J. Collins Manager 

W. C. DendyI 

A. E. Raney I Saxophones 

H. H. Welch] 

J. H. Hamlln Baritone 

T. P. Evans Piano 

J. H. Myers i 

R. L. Simpson j Trumpets 

R. D. Ritchie Bass 

W. J. Collins Drum 



Page One Hundred Seventy 



ti 



1930 





X 

£ 
O 



ti 



930 



fk 



Page One Hundred Seventy-one 



880 



Hie^ South Qarolina cAssociatioru of 
Qollege^ c^nnual Editors 

OFFICERS 1929-1930 

President First Vice-President Sernnd Vice-President 

Fant H. Thornley Betty Smith Dorothy L. Seay 

Presbyterian College Winthrop College College of Charleston 

Secretary Treasurer 

I. Wilson Barber Wilson Stokes 

Fiirman University WolTord College 

MEMBERS 

"The Comet" The Collf.ge of Charleston 

MISS DOKOTHV I.. SEAV 

"The Sororian" AnueksOi'v College 

MISS FROINDE RICE 

"The Naiad" Lander College 

MISS LAURA AKRINGTON 

"Y's and Other Y's" Converse College 

MISS CAROLYN LEONARD 

"The Taller" WiNTHROP COLLEGE 

MISS BETTY SMYTH 

"The Columbian" Columbia College 

MISS TOMMIE AMAKER 

"The Calciid" Limestone College 

MISS ELLEN QUINN 

"Nods & Becks" Chicora College 

MISS MARY COCKS 

"Entre Nous" Greenville Women's College 

MISS LOUISE PATTON 

"Coker College Annual" CoKER COLLEGE 

MISS MARY HILL 

"The Erskine Arrow" Erskine and Due West Female College 

JOE GETIYS — MISS FINLEY 

"The sphinx" The Citadel 

TOM COOKSEY 

"The lionhomie" Furman University 

I. W. BAIUIER 

"The Newherrian" Newberry College 

G. MCLEOD HODGE 

"Taps" Clemson College 

MARION D. WARE 

"Garnet & lihick" The IIniversity of South Carolina 

BOB WAUCIIOUI'E 

"The lliiliemian" WoFFORD College 

WILSON STOKES 

"The PaC SaC" Presbyterian College 

FANT H. THORNLEY 



Page One llundieil Seventy-two 



« 



1930 



m 



880 




ti 



930 



l»> 



Page One Hundred Seventy-three 



880 










Tbarroij jfH^lBJ 

1^ 

Stlhspie, ^^^^^^^^ Copdand 

I 

Jlea))s Crari^ord Kcj)i)cdu Chapti) Jiarden 

yomxQ (fM,triS Qhristiaii-, r^ssociatioru 

<$> <$> 

W. T. Barron President 

P. A. Roberts Vice-President 

0. W. Chapin Secretary and Treasurer 

CABLNET 

J. E. Means R. H. Gillespie J. L. Hardin 

E. E. Wade J. I. Copeland W. H. Jackson 

L. B. Stephenson R. S. Crawford J. R. Kennedy 



Page One Uuntlnd Screnly-jour 



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« 



930 



fk 



Page One Hundred Seventy-five 



880 



HDehates of the^ year 

Query: Resolved: That the Nations should adopt a plan of complete disarmament, 
excepting such forces as are needed for police purposes. 

PRESBYTERIAN COLLEGE vs. WOFFORD COLLEGE 

AT NEWBERRY COI.LEOE 

Presbyterian College Affirmative: L. R. Williamson. T. G. Ellis. 
PRESBYTERIAN COLLEGE w. NEWBERRY COLLEGE 

AT WOFFORD COLLEGE 

Presbyterian College Negative: G. G. Palmer. T. M. Johnston. 

PRESBYTERIAN COLLEGE vs. ERSKINE COLLEGE 
Dual Debate 

AT PRESBYTERIAN COLLEGE AND ERSKINE COLLEGE 

Presbyterian College Affirmative: L. R. WILLIAMSON. T. G. Ellis. 
Presbyterian College Negative: G. G. Palmer, T. i\I. Johnston. 

Query: Resolved: That Higher Education should be limited to those of special 
Mental Ability. 

PRESBYTERIAN COLLEGE vs. THE CITADEL 

AT WINTHROP COLLEGE 

Presbyterian College Negative: G. G. Palmer. T. \1. Johnston. 

^^ 

Query: Resolved: That the merging of banks and stores into Chain Systems is de- 
trimental to the economic and moral welfare of the American People. 

PRESBYTERIAN COLLEGE vs. FURMAN UNIVERSITY 
Dual Debate 

AT PRESBYTERIAN COLLEGE AND FURMAN UNIVERSITY 

Presbyterian (College Affirmative: W. E. Johnson. J. I. Copel.\nd. 
Presbyterian College Negative: W. M. Bl.\kely, M. P. Snipes. 



Page One Hundred Seventy-six 



(lEEEtt 



880 





\^S1TY 

Debators 





dohijsion 



Copela/td 



ti 



1930 



ft 



Page One Hundred Seventy-seven 



880 



"^presentative^ 5- (?♦ ^- ©• ^• 

♦ <$> 

T. M. Johnston 

Presbyterian College Orator in South Carolina 

Intercollegiate Oratorical Contest at 

WINTHROP COLLEGE 

Presbyterian College Representative in the South Carolina 
Intercollegiate Oratorical Association 

COMMENCEMENT DECLAIMERS '29 
R. H. Gillespie L. B. Stephenson 

... "The Meaning of the Declaration 

"The Hilarious Horde ^j Independence" 

M. T. Murphy 

''What Think Ye of Christ?'' 

COMMENCEMENT ORATORS '29 

T G Ellis ^ • ^- J^^kson 

„ ', ■ , , ., "The Only One Who Can Defeat You 

"Modern i lysses ' ,^ Yourself" 

B. H. Dickson 

''Walter Mines Page" 

FORENSIC WINNERS ■28-"29 

T. M. Johnston -ilurnni Orator's Medal 

T. E. Davis Best Delator's Medal 

M. T. Murphy Commencement Declaimers Medal 

T. G. Ellis Commencement Orator's Medal 



Page One Hundred Seventy-eight 



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f^N|I|E5 



ti 



1930 



fk 



Page One Hundred Seventy-nine 



880 



Tan^^'^ellenic Qouncil 

OFFICERS 

R. B. Caldwell, Kappa Alpha President 

W. E. Walker. Pi Kappa Alpha Vice-President 

A. G. Thornton, Pi Kappa Phi Secretary-Treasurer 

MEMBERS 

C. J. Martin Alpha Kappa Pi 

A. 0. Jackson 4lplui Lambda Tau 

F. D. Rogers Beta Kappa 



Page One Hundred Eighty 



ti 



1930 



OE 



880 




li 



1930 



^> 



Page One Hundred Eighty-one 



880 




Ti K^ppa cAlpha 

(Founded 1868) 

-$> ■$> 

Color: Garnet ami Gold Flower; Lily of the Valley 

(Seventy-Eight Active Chapters) 

cMu Chapter 

(Established 1890 — Re-established 1921) 

BROTHERS IN FACULTY 

D. J. Brimm J. McSwEEN F. D. Jones 

Capt. R. E. Wysor, Jr. 

BROTHERS IN CITY 
A. H. CoPELAND J. A. DuGAN B. H. Boyd 

BROTHERS IN COLLEGE 

Class of '30 

W. T. Barron, President D. D. Beckman I. M. Keels 

R. E. Perry C. S. Rigby, Jr. 

W. E. Walker 

Class of \31 

H. P. Jones 0. W. Ferrene R. M. Lynn 

A. K. Wyatt E. H. Wyatt 

Class of '32 
W. R. Senter, Jr. H. H. Welch 

Class of '33 

R. F. Brown S. L. Clarke H. S. Elliott 

J. I). FiLP H. Holmes B. Craham, Jr. 

J. E. OsMAN W. R. Perry 



Page Onr lliinilrcil Kighly-luu 



ti 



1930 




880 




J(eels y/t/cttlK 



5 rah dm yYclch 




J 0066 




Holn)C5 J^rowi) Perry Yl' Ciliotl Clcirke 



a 



1930 



ft 



Page One Hundred Eighty-three 



880 



Kappa cSAlpha 

(Founded 1865, Washington and Lee) 

^ <$> 

Colors: Crimson and Gold Flowers: Magnolia and Red Rose 

Sixty-seven Active Chapters 

"^eta Ti Chapter 

( Established 1924 ) 

BROTHERS IN CITY 

W. R. Anderson, Jr. P. S. Bailey J. S. Dendy F. D. Jones. Jr. 
J. B. TowNSEND. Jr. J. H. Witherspoon, Jr. 

BROTHERS IN COLLEGE 

Class of 30 
R. B. Caldwell E. F. Mason S. G. Stukes 

Class of '31 
H. U. Jackson J. M. MacFie 

Class of '32 
B. B. DuNLAP H .E. Everett 

Class of '33 

W. Carr H. H. Ferguson J. T. Neely N. G. Quantz 

R. L. Wvlie J. 0. \^'ooDs R. L. Woodside 

Pledges 
S. P. Watson 



Page Onr llunilrt-d Eighly-jour 



« 



1930 



l>> 



880 




7-erausojr Woodside 



ti 



1930 



)^ 



Page One Hundred Eighty -jive 



880 




Ti Kappa ^hi 

( Founded in 190 1 1 



Colors: White and Gold 



Flower: Red Rose 



BROTHERS IN FACULTY 
H. E. SturceoiN L. S. AIcMillla.n J. H. Hunter H. T. Swedenburg 

BROTHERS IN CITY 

H. L. Eichelbercer R. E. Sadler T. D. Jacobs J. F. Jacobs. Jr. 

W. P. Jacobs J. P. McMillan J. P. Yolnc J. C. Neville 

BROTHERS IN COLLEGE 

Class of '30 

I. M. Adair R. S. Cr-\wford C. W. Grafton J. W. Milam. Jr. 

P. A. Roberts A. G. Thornton. Jr. 

Class of il 

T. J. Blalock. Jr. W. W. Davis J. R. Kennedy S. M. Sims. Jr. 

F. R. Stallworth B. R. Young 

Class of '32 
G. C. Adams B. F. Wyman 

Class of 33 

C. W. Adams B. W. Covington, Jr. J. W. Dillard. Jr. J. G. Fr^\mpton 

H. H. Hunter, Jr. J. C. McCaskill. Jr. H. L. Nettles 

F. B. PiNSON, Jr. L. H. Winter 

Pledges 
C. J. Barrett 



Page One Hundred Eighty-six 



ti 



1930 



fk 



880 





Cra^rd 5forjfto/j 




A 



Jra/toj) JiildK 



^i^^ Stdlmrtj ^^3^"/ ^€/jj)e(fj/ i/0UT)g 





{dansC KKasKill fc^l^fc Muj)ter J)ans 






Pirj^on Miilts 



ik 



1930 



^> 



Page One Hundred Eighty-seven 



880 



^* 




(SMpha Lambda ^au 

(Founded 1916, Oglethuipe Lniveisity) 



«> <$> 



Colors: Old Gold ami Black 



Flower: American Beauty Rose 



%ta Qhapter 

(Established 19271 

BROTHER IN FACULTY 

W. L. Jones 
BROTHERS IN COLLEGE 

Class of '30 

J. A. Babb a. 0. Jackson 

J. S. Dendv E. L. Jackson 

Class of '31 

O. W. Chapin. Jr. J. F. Fortson W. H. Gosnell, Jr. T. M. Johnston 

R. P. Moore N. E. Truesdell 

Class of '32 

E. V. Anderson A. D. Ferguson, Jr. W. P. Ferguson 

L. C. Jackson M. T. Murphy 

Class of '33 
J. N. Dendy 

Pledges 

J. E. Graham B. A. Lowry E. J. Steele 

J. K. Taylor D. M. Upshur 



Page Onr Iliinilrrd Eighly-ciglit 



ti 



1930 



fk 



880 




Sm^am 2)e))(AJ\f 



(lEEEtt 



Page One Hundred Eighty-nine 



880 



^eta Kcippci 

(Founded 1901. Haniline I niversity) 

Colors: Purple and Gold Flower: Red Templar Rose 

Publication: Beta Kappa Journal 

cAlpha Eta Chapter 

(Established 19301 

Class of '31 

O. A. Dlnlap J. B. Green. Jr. George A. James 

R. D. Ritchie F. D. Rogers, Jr. 

AI. P. Sherard 

Class of '32 
R. H. Gillespie J. L. Harden D. M. McNalll 

Class of '33 
J. D. PoLLiTZER R. \\ . Rampey J. H. St.amps 

Pledges 

A. B. Blakely p. B. Harris W. M. McCr-Ary 

L. M. Perrin L. R. Williamson 



Page Une Hundred .\inely 



ti 



1930 



fk 



880 




1 

SiUetpieliH Jiarde.}) Ji'^J/auU Mams Sinpsoj/ 

'-^ ^*^ fe^*^ pI'^*!!^ c ' 

Perrii) Jfanpetf Jl'Crarc/ Stamps Folldzer 










Cd 



930 



^:fe 



Page One Hundrnd Ninety-one 



880 




Colors: Green and While 



Flower: Yellow Tea Rose 



<SMpha Kappa Ti 

(Founded 19211 

6ta 0\apter 

(Founded 19281 

BROTHERS IN COLLEGE 



Class of '30 

R. S. Beckham N. P. Clinton J. E. Means 

J. W. McQueen C. J. Martin 

Class of '31 
A. H. McQueen 



M. A. Bennett 



W. G. Adair 



C. H. Hamer 



Class of '32 
M. P. Caskey 

Class of '33 

J. B. COPELAND 

W. M. White 
Pledges 

H. R. LOCKMAN 

F. B. Parker 



J. M. Whitsett 



J. F. Davis 



R. L. McLaurin 



Page One Hundred Ninetyttvo 



ti 



1930 



Oe 



880 








Si 

Has/ 16 



W/)2tt locknaN 



1^ Pc rAa' Copik fjd 





hdair J/aner 



Cd 



930 



^> 



Page One Hundred Ninety-three 



880 



The pure, the bright, the beautiful. 

That stirred our hearts in youth, 
The impulse to a wordless prayer. 

The dreams of love and truth. 
The longings after something lost. 

The spirits yearning cry. 
The strivings after better hopes — 

These things can never die. 

The timid hand stretch'd forth to aid 

A brother in his need. 
The kindly word in grief's dark hour 

That proves the friend indeed. 
The plea for mercy softly breathed 

When justice threatens nigh. 
The sorrow of a contrite heart — 

These things shall never die. 

7 he memory of a clasping hand. 

The pressure of a kiss. 
And all the trifles sweet and frail 

That makes up love's first bliss — 
// with a firm unchanging faith. 

And holy trust and high. 
Those hands have clasp\l, those lips have met. 

These things shall never die. 



/'nge One Hundred Ninety-jour 



ti 



1930 



^> 



880 




ti 



930 



>^ 



Page One Hundred Ninety-five 



880 



Ti Kappa ^elta 

OFFICERS 

G. G. Palmer President 

T. M. Johnston Vice-President 

J. I. COPELAND Secretary-Treasurer 



MEMBERS 



G. G. Palmer 
0. W. Chapin 
T. M. Johnston 



J. I. CoPELAND 

R. T. Gillespie 
L. R. Williamson 



T. G. Ellis 



Page One Hundred Ninety-six 



ti 



1930 




880 







61! 



ts 



1<I 



1930 



^ 



Page One Hundred Ninety-seven 



880 



Jigma Vpsiloru 

• Honorary Literary Society — Foumleil 1906) 



<S> <$> 



his (Chapter 

(Eslablisheil 1926) 



W. M. Brown 



BROTHERS L\ FACULTY 

iM. G. WOODWORTH H. T. SWEDENBLRG. Jr. 



BROTHERS IN COLLEGE 

Class of '30 

P. A. Roberts, Ptcs. J. S. Dendv A. 0. Jackson L. R. Williamson 

C. W. GR-AFTON. Vice-Pres. R. T. GiLLESPlE B. H. DiCKSON, Treas. 

T. G. Ellis 

Class of '31 
B. R. Young. Sec. 0. W. Chapin 

J. L COPELAND 

Class of '32 
G. K. Smith 



Page One Hundred Ninety-eight 



ti 



1930 




880 




JacksoN 





IJejjdy 




Srajitc 



or) 




Silts 





SMiif) 



St Uespit 






%d(so^ 



ChOdn^ Uoufjf 



^tJh 



lOMSOl^ 



ti 



930 



)y 



Page One Hundred Ninety-nine 



880 



Chi "Beta T/ii 

Honorary Scientific Fraternity 
(Founded Randolph Macon College 1916) 



<S> <$> 



Colors: Colonial Blue and Crimson Flower: Cape Jasmine 

Motto: "Scientia omnia vincit" 

Eta Qhapter 

(Established 1925) 

BROTHERS IN COLLEGE 
Class of '30 

A. 0. Jackson, President L. R. Willl-vmson, Vice-President 

J. S. Dendy, Acting President G. B. Telford, Recording Secretary 

L. T. Flemming a. G. Thornton W. B. McCall 



E. H. Wyatt, Treasurer 



Class of '31 

J. A. Hamlin 



R. P. Moore 



Class of '32 
G. K. Smith, Corresponding Secretary 

Aim: The object of this organization is to promote interest in science: first, by 
keeping up with scientific investigation ; second, by means of papers prepared by 
regular members, and fourth, by means of round table discussion. 



« 



1930 



Oe 



Page Two Hundred 



880 




Wk JiaMlirj 



SMltlj 



« 



1930 



Hfe 



Page Two Hundred One 



880 



International ^^lations Qluh 

Colors: Blue and W liiie Flower: Poppy 

Motto: '^Ducil amor genlium" 
Faculty Advisers M. W. Brown, J. B. Kennedy 

MEMBERS 

Class of '30 

J. A. Babb. President D. D. Beckman R. S. Beckham 

W. J. Hazelwood E. E. Wade L. R. Willlamson 

W. E. Johnson B. H. Dickson 



Class of '31 



J. I. COPEL-AND 



J. B. Green 
T. M. Johnston 



R. M. Lynn 

0. A. DuNL-^P 



0. W. Chapin 



Class of '32 



G. K. Smith 



R. H. Gillespie 



Aim: To foster amity among all nations, to promote a greater peaee and neigh- 
borly feeling among inilividuals of all races. 



« 



1930 



fk 



Page Two Hundred Two 



880 




Sillesptt 











1930 




Jol^tpto/j 



^i)^ 




m 




Cope'Land 






. -Si. ^ 




i ii 





J)ui^laj3 %ecK.ffi>) Spi 




ec/j 



Cl^aatp ! 



« 



1930 



Hk 



Page Two Hundred Three 



880 



SigTTia K^ppa cAlpha 

(Honorary Scholastic Fralernity) 
Establislied 1925 



<S> <» 



ALPHA ORDER 

A. 0. Jackson C. W. Grafton R. T. Gillespie 

W. B. McCall R. S. Crawford 



W. L. Plaxico 



BETA ORDER 

J. B. Green 
J. W. Walkup 



0. A. DUNLAP 



GAMMA ORDER 

G. K. Smith R. H. Gillespie H. H. Welsh V. S. White 

R. B. Ferguson W. P. Ferguson 



Page Till) lliimlnil Four 



1930 



life 



880 




SilUspie HS. JcfcKi 



Srcdtop Craytford 




7iali(u-p Jer^v.sor)1\ 



"[fer^usofjTi^ Tfzlcl) 



1930 



>^ 



Page Two Hundred Five 



880 



Qamma ^I'gnia 

I Hunoran Journalistic Fraternity) 
Founded 1929 

oAlpha Chapter 

OFFICERS 

L. C. Jackson President 

F. H. Thornley Vice-President 

B. R. Young Secretary 

0. W. Chapin Treasurer 

HONORARY MEMBERS 

H. T. SWEDENBURG 

BROTHERS IN COLLEGE 
Class of '30 

F. H. Thornley L. R. Williamson 

T. G. Ellis G. G. Palmer 

Class of '31 
B. R. Young O. W. Chapin 

Class of '32 
L. C. Jackson 

Aim: Td pnimote and stinmlale interest in journalism. 



ti 



1930 




Piigf Tun Hundred Six 



880 




Ks Jf)oryki/ 



Cfjajyi// J| 



1930 




Pase Two Hundred Seven 



880 



IDramatic Qluh 

«>♦ 

OFFICERS 

T. M. Johnston President 

W. J. Collins J'ice-Presideni 

D. S. Wood Secretary-Treasurer 

MEMBERS 

C. W. Grafton J. H. Myers 

W. C. Dendy m. T. Murphy 



li 



1930 




Page Two Hundred Eight 



880 




1930 



fj^ 



Page Two Hundred Nine 



880 



Thilomathearu Literary Society 



^<s> 



First Semester 

Dickson. B. H. . . 
eubanks, j. s. . . 
Anderson. E. \. . 



OFFICERS 

Second Semester 

President Ellis. T. G. 

Vice-President Johnson, W. E. 

Secretary Blakelv. W. M. 

Faculty Advisor: R. G. Seeger 



Adams. G. C. 
Anderson. C. W. 
Anderson, E. V. 
Blakely. W. M. 
Brig.man. F. L. 
burdette. j. m. 
c0pel.\nd. j. i. 
Dickson, B. H. 



MEMBERS OF SOCIETY 

Ellis. T. G. 
Elbanks, J. S. 
Ferguson, A. D. 
Floyd, C. D. 
Hamilton, K. L. 
Heeth, J. M. 
Johnson, W. E. 



Ketchi M. \^ . B. 
Lesene. L. L. 
Myers, J. 
Plowden. C. \^'. 
Rhodes, E. R. 
Snipes. M. P. 

\^HITE. \ . S. 
\\ ILLIAMSON. L. 



Page Two Hundred Ten 



ti 



1930 



)\ 



880 




Id 



930 



Ht 



Page Two Hundred Eleven 



880 



6u/v05mia)i_j Literary Society 



<$> <s> 



OFFICERS 

First Semester Second Semester 

Graham. B President McCutchen, W. J. 

.Montgomery, G. H J ice-President Parker. F. B. 

McCltchen, G. H Secretary Montgomery. H. J. 

Faculty Adviser: H. T. SwEDENBERG 



Abrams, Lawson 
Carpenter, H. C. 
Davis, J. F. 
Ferguson. H. H. 
Good, L. C. 

GR-4HAM, B. 

Gray, L. 
Johnson, H. C. 



MEMBERS OF SOCIETY 

McCaskill, J. 
McCltchen. W. J. 
Montgomery. G. H. 



Montgomery. 
Neely, J. T. 
Neel, W. 
Odiorne, J. W 
Parker. F. B. 



H. J. 



Ransom, W. M. 
Reeder. W. D. 
Rice. 0. A. 
Stamps. How.\rd 
Street. Clyde 
Lpshlr. D. M. 
Wylie. R. L. 
Watson. S. P. 



Page Two Hundred Tivelve 



ti 



1930 




880 




■1' ^ 0M UK uM 





"^mk 



Carpe/jfer otan^i Jtoij^^a/ie/y eJ bj/'ay 





S/O-Vj 6free-C Joljfjso// ft- CasAtU J?afy6oy^ 



ti 



1930 



^> 



Page Two Hundred Thirteen 



880 



honorary fraternities on the Qampus 



^ <$> 




I STIMLLATE interest in the finer things of life, to inculcate the desire for 
self-improvement, to reward those who excel, and to provide a means by 
which those whose interests are the same might come together and enjoy 
each others fellowship and encouragement, honorary fraternities were es- 
tablished at this college. Presbvterian College is indeed fortunate in hav- 
ing honorarv fraternities which offer encouragement along so manv and such varied 
lines of endeavor. Following is a brief sketch of each of these societies. 

Pi Kappa Delta Forensic Fraternity was the first honorary to be established here. 
The best orators and debators of the institution have been named on its rolls. The 
two literarv societies. Eukosmian for the freshmen and Philomathean for upperclass- 
men. enroll those men who have shown abilitv and interest in public speaking. L nder 
the competent instruction of Dr. Seeger and Prof. Swedenberg these men are thor- 
oughly trained in the different phases of forensic work. Pi Kappa Delta receives 
into membership those of the society who have been particularly outstanding. 

The International Relations Club came to this campus as a result of a growing 
interest among the students in international affairs and a desire to promote good-will 
and understanding among the nations of the world. Following in quick order came 
the Chi Beta Phi Scientific fraternitv on whose rolls are the names of manv men who 
have made brilliant records in scientific work. 

One of the highest scholastic honors that Presbyterian College offers is member- 
ship in the Sigma Kappa .\lpha class orders which was organized in 1925. 

Isis chapter of Sigma L psilon Literary Fraternity w as founded at Presbiilerian 
College in 1925. In stimulating a love for good literature and encouraging its com- 
position. Sigma L psilon since its installation here has been particularly successful. 
Sigma L psilon is the largest national of its kind and the men of Isis chapter feel 
themselves favored in being granted membership in this famous organization. 

Gamma Sigma is a new comer to this campus, being organized this year. For 
several vears this college has been verv fortunate in having among its student body 
quite a number of promising young journalists. Feeling a need for some means by 
which to encourage journalist work, the faculty granted these men a charter to found 
Gamma Sigma. 

The Dramatic Club joins in brotherhood those souls which seek expression 
through the medium of the drama. The club presents several excellent plays each 
year not only in Clinton, but in surrounding towns. Its programs are always attended 
by large audiences because the people of the state have learned that they will never 
be disappointed with a performance of this club. 

^\^^ile most of these organizations are still young on the campus, their members 
are men of real merit — men whose zeal and enthusiasm lead on to hiaher things. 



Page Tuo Hundred Fourteen 



a 



1930 





SPONSVH9 





MISS s\i; \ii II \">s 

(IK Cll All ,\M1I".A, TkNN. 

Sliiiliinl llii(h Siiiinsar 




MISS DOKOTHV GltlSOM 

OF ASHEVILLE. N. C. 

PaC SaC Business Staff S/wiisu 





^/\E 



Al 




I 



I 



MISS FRANCES SHI TE 

OF Monroe. N. C. 

I'tiC SiiC Advertising Staff Sponsor 




MISS HELEN SIMMONS 

OF Chestkr, S. C. 

Piin-llt^l/t'nir (unituil Sponsor 





I J' 



^^ 





^ 



MISS MARGARET Di FREE 
OF Due West, S. C. 

Senior Class Sponsor 





MISS CHARLOTTE REID 

OF Chaklkston. W. \ a. 

junior Class Sponsor 







-MISS HELEN MIX.SU.N 

OF Union, S. C. 
Sophomore Class Sponsor 




MISS HKl.KN MOSS 
or KocK Hill, S. C. 

Frrslirntifi (^Ifiss Sponsor 




MISS MINNIE BECKMAN 

OF McClellanville. S. C. 

Varsity Football Sponsor 









«^ 



MISS AN.NE LATHAN 

OF Chester, S. C. 

( arsity Basketball Sponsor 




MISS JEAN CMAERN 

OK Kkkshaw, S. C. 
( nrsify Hnsehnll Sponsor 




MISS Kl.l/.\i;l III 1)1 NEKNKI 
(li (;iii.i. NMi.i.i;. S. (!. 
I arsih Tracit .S />('/( so/ 




MISS VIVIAN TAYLOR 

OF JOHNSONVILLE. S. C. 
Varsity Boxing Sponsor 




MISS ELIZABETH NOLAN 

OF Spartanburg. S. C. 
Freshman Football Sponsor 




MISS liEEUA ANN HOLSTEIN 

OK FRA^KL1^, Ini). 
Baltalion Sponsur 




MISS KKANCES SALLE> 

OK PlNEWOOD. S .C. 
) . M. C. A. Sponsor 




MISS MARY HELEN DAWSON 

OF Wadksboho, N. C. 
I'i kappa Alpha Sponsor 




MISS CECELIA ARL\1L 
OF Columbia. S. C. 
Kappa Alpha Sponsor 




MISS CATHERINE JONES 

OF Clinton, S. C. 

Pi Kappa Phi Sponsor 




MISS KATHLEEN ANDERSEN 

OF CONHAY. S. C. 
lieta Kappa Sponsor 




MISS MARTHA HUGULEY 

OF West Point, Ga. 
Alpha Lambda Tau Sponsor 




MISS KATHLEEN ROGERS 

OF Charlotte, N. C. 

Alpha Kappa Pi Sponsor 




880 



/ fill this cup to one made up 

Of loveliness alone, 
A woman, of her gentle sex 

The seeming paragon; 
To whom the better elements 

And kindly stars hare given 
A form so fair, that, like the air, 

'Tis less of earth than heaven. 

— Edward Coates Pinckxev. 



ti 



1930 



fk 




Mll-ITARV 




880 




The Colors 



« 



1930 



Di 



Page Tivo Hundred Thirty-three 



880 




BATTALION STAFF 

C. W. Grafton. Major; P. A. Robkrts, Adjutant: R. S. CiiAWFOKn. Ballalinn Sii|i|ily Officer: 

J. W. McQuEiiM, Signal Officer. 



I'age Two Hurulrvd Thirty -four 



« 



1930 



^> 



880 




H 
H 

a 

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1930 



OE 



Page Two Hundred Thirly-jive 



880 




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Watson 








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1930 



Oi 



'v-eight 



880 




Q 
Q "■ 

03 



a 
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5 ..■ g a ,- ^- S 

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►J 3 h; ^ w 

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u n t:^ ^ t: 



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1930 



Kfc 



Page riDo Hundred Thirty-nine 



880 




< 

H 

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5 



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as 



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1930 



I'fige Tun Humlrtd Forty 



Hfe 




ADS. SATIRE 




880 




ti 



930 




Page Two Hundred Forty-one 



880 



Jokes 



Prof. Martin : "The photographers never 
do me justice." 
Jim Boyd: '"You want mercy, not justice." 

,}) .j> <i, 
.Mother: "\^ here do bad little girls go?" 
Betty : "Most ever)"where." 

<s> <?. ^ 
"Watch rae shake that thing." said the 
elephant, coming to a suspension bridge. 
-j> <$> <?' 
Prof. Sturgeon: "What can you tell me 
about nitrates?" 

Ben Covington: "They are a lot lower 
than day rates." 

♦ <» <& 
J.\CK: "I've rung this door bell for hours, 
and my girl won't answer." 

Bill: "Make a noise like an ice man." 

<$> <i> ^ 
A Frenchman and an Englishman were hav- 
ing quite an argument at the trading post in 
Canada. 

"Well." said the Englishman, "you don't 
ever see any half-breed English.' 

"The squaws had to draw the line some- 
where." replied the Frenchman. 

— Kansas Sour Owl. 
<^ <?' '♦ 
CONTENTS OF THE AVER.AGE 
NOTEBOOK 
16 Telephone numbers 

12 Drawings, girls' heads 
23 Drawings, girls' legs 

1 Imaginative drawing, the dean 

1 Imaginative drawing, prexy 

1 Preliminary draft, letter to Susan 

1 Preliminary draft, letter to dad 

13 .Addresses 

2 Poughkeepsie addresses 
1 Recipe, beer-witb-a-kick 
6 Pages, chemistry notes 

— Williams Purple Cow. 
4> <'^ ■♦> 
A janitor is known by the temperature he 
keeps. 



"I've changed my mind." 

"\^ ell, does it work any better?" 

— Annapolis Log. 

Tillie: "The professor has made me his 
private secretary. Do you think 111 get an 
advance?" 

Millie: "Lots of tbeiu, dearie." 

— Lafayette Lyre. 
^ ^ <$> 
GREAT AMERICAN PARTNERSHIPS 
Hamanaygz. 
Pennonink. 
Breadanbutter. 
Toastancawfee. 
■ i,- ;^ ■•■> 
It won't do any good to spank a girl after 
she is sixteen, but it must be lots of fun. 

— Ohio State. 

The college man doesn't have to look at the 
world through rose colored glasses — his eyes 
are always bloodshot. 

— Broun Jug. 

And then there is the absent-minded pro- 
fessor who had the students write the exam 
questions while he answered them. 

— U. of S. Calif. Wampus. 
<«• 'i> -i"- 
He sowed his wild oats and mixed in corn 
and rye. 

SUBTLETY 
Oh, when you swear on all above 

To worship me when dying. 
.\h. may you never learn, my love. 

How well I know you're lying. 

Or when you pledge your faithfulness 

As 'neath the moon we sit, 

I hope that you will never guess 

I know it's 'cause you're lit! 

— Gerry Williams. 
<S> ^ <» 
In most families father owes best. 



Page Tuo Hundred Fortyluo 



ti 



1930 



l»> 



880 




LOVE BIKD5 



Cd 



1930 



i»> 



Page Tuo Hundred Forty-three 



880 



Headline in newspaper: "Gas 
Overcomes Girl ^ hile Taking Bath." 

Miss Cecelia Jones owes her life 
to the watchfulness of the elevator 
boy and the janitor of the hotel 
where she was stopping. 

— Broun Jug. 

<J> <J> <J> 

Freshman Pollitzer says: "We 
may be 'Rats' but I've heard it said 
that women will jump on chairs 
and pull up their skirts for one." 

<$> <^ <$> 

'■\^"hy is the National Biscuit Com- 
pany financing an African expedi- 
tion?" 

"They want to get some new de- 
signs for their animal crackers.'" 
— Missouri Outlau. 




1 



mt*"- 



if I had win^s of an angel 



<*> ^ •«> 

"\X'ell. Dad. Betty won the blue ribbon at 
the beauty show." 

"Good, now she'll have something to wear." 
— Boston Beanpot. 

^ ^ <J> 

"So your father is a Southern planter?" 
"Yes, he's an undertaker in .\tlanta." 

— Froth. 



"This will run into money." cried the mon- 
key as he poured a glass of water in the cash 
register. 

<S> <§■ <$> 

Then there was llie modest old maid who 
wouldn"t undress with the Christian Observer 
in the room. 

— Orange Peel. 
<S> <$> <S> 



^ <& ^ 

Although God alone can make a tree, it 
takes a college to make the sap. 

— A'. Florence Crane Collier. 



He: "\^ hen I talk to you I have to feel 
for my words."" 

She: "Yeah! X^'ell. you must think that I 
have "em tattooed on me."' 

— Snipper. 



-$> <S> <J> 

Violets are green. 
Daisies are pink. 

Immediately after 

The thirteenth drink. 



Page Two Hundred Forty- four 



li 



1930 



fk 



880 




\ * -r 



ti 



1930 



>^ 



Page Two Hundred Forty-five 



880 



M. S. Bailey & Son, Bankers 

Established 1910 

THE BANK OF LONG STANDING INSURES 
YOUR DEPOSITS 

We Invite Your Account 



W. J. Bailev, President 
R. C. Adair, Cashier R. S. Owens, Teller 

G. L. Simpson, Teller R. G. Watson, Jr., Bookkeeijer 



SUITS, SPORT TOGS, TUXEDOS AND TOP 
COATS— HAND TAILORED 

and Sold Exclusively by 

BROOKS 

BALTIMORE. MI). 
"Creators of Styles for College Men" 



S. G. STUKES, Campus Represeutative 



Page Two Hundred Forty-six 



ti 



930 




880 




when you 
need 



alotabs 



One tablet at bedtime 
with a swallow of water, 
that's all. Next morning 
you are feeling fine with a hearty ap- etite 
for breakfast. Ent what you wish, — no danger. 



i^ 



1930 



^ 



Page Two Hundred Forty-seven 



880 











If Toii are thinking of entering a suit. 






CONSULT US 






We Are Clothes Attorneys 






MARSH ALL-TATUM CO. 






Knoun for Good Clothes 






COLUMBIA, S. C. 






Diamonds. Sterling Silver 






and Fine \^ atclies 






are the gifts that are always appreciated, more than money or 
any other gift, and are the most economical gifts, as they last 
for a life-time and can be passed on to the survivors as much 
more valuable than when originally purchased, on account of 
its association and sentimental value. 






Our all Genuine collection contains the world's finest 
merchandise, the kind vou mar give with pride. 






SYLVAN BROS. 




1 


1500 ilain Street Cor. ^Main & Hampton 






COLUMBIA. S. C. 






Agents for the Genuine Orange Blossom Wedding Ring and Mountings, 

and for Stevens Wedding Invitations and Cards. 

Mail Orders Invited 




1 




1 
1 



Page Tuo Hundred Forty-eight 



ti 



1930 




880 











Every Christian is called to minister — some are called 
into the ministry. 

The Christian background which made vou a student 
at P.C. 

The Christian purpose of P.C. 

The Christian enthusiasm inspired by the fiftieth anni- 
versary of P.C. 

These may be elements in your call. 

UNION THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

RICHMOND, VIRGINIA 

has helped many a young man to prepare for spiritual 
leadership. Perhaps, she can help you, too. 

Catalog and Injornmtion U pon Request 
















Mail Orders 

INVITED 

And will receive prompt at- 
tention. If you mention this 
college annual when you 
write we will know that Pac 
Sac advertising is worth 
while. 

The 
State Book Store 

And Printing House 

COLUMBIA, S. C. 




J. O. JONES CO. 

Greenville 

Outfitters to 
College Men 















Cd 



1930 



i»> 



Page Two Hundred Forty-nine 











Southeastern Life lusurance Company 

Organized 1905 
C. 0. MILFORD, President GREENVILLE, S. C. 

Capital, Surplus and Reserve for Protection of policyholders, 

over THREE MILLION NINE HUNDRED 

THOUSAND DOLLARS 












FRONTIS JEWELRY STORE 

CLINTON, S. C. 

Our selection of exceptionally fine Jewelry contains articles of 
apiieal for every College Boy and Girl, suitable for all occasions. 

Come in and see our fine assortment — no obligation to buy. 












COMPLIMENTS 

OF 

George A. Weathers 




I^egerton & Co., Inc. 

CHARLESTON, S, C, 

Booksellers — Stationers 
Engravers 

Class Pins — Class Rings 
Cominencemeut Invitations 












LORICK & LOWRANCE, Inc. 

COLUMBIA, S. C. 

Wholesale Distrib\itors of 

"MAJESTir"— Ranges, Steam Cookers, Coffee Vrns and other Kitchen Equipment. 
•SHEXANGO"— Hotel China. "BUFFALO"— Bre.td Sllcer. 
•CRESCEXT"— Electric Dish Washers. "BUFFALO"— Meat, Food, Vegetable Choppers. 
■STEKLIXG"— Peelers. 
•\\E.\K-EVER" — .\luminum Jacketed steam kettles. 

Sleam Tables, Cook Tables, Utensils in re-tinned steel, .\lumlnum 
and enameled wares. 











Page Two Hundred Fifty 



« 



1930 



fk 



880 



R. H. STEWART 



TANDY W. JONES 



STEWART-MERRIT CO. 

Men's and Boys' Clothing 



26 S. MAIN ST. 



GREENVILLE, S. C. 



KEITH' 


S 








Where The Smart Woman 


Shops 






GREENVILLE, S. C. 




MAIN 


AT 


NORTH 



IF IT'S GOOD TO EAT, WE HAVE IT 

BLAKELY'S 

FANCY GROCERIES 



Phones 132, 136, 175 



Clinton, S. C. 



a 



1930 



Oe 



Page Two Hundred Firty-one 



880 



ciMieMiekJWoMqai 

^ Jf "EXCLUSIVELY" / 


Ta 

1 


^■r SPORTING 


GOODS 


wf 


W(fJ/ Mam St. 


Columbia.. 


se 



MARY MUSGROVE TEA ROOM 

CLINTON, S. C. 

"GOOD HOME COOKING" 

Your Patronage Appreciated 



ALBERT T. VAUGHAN, Inc. 

Jewelers — Silversmiths — Stationers 

117 North Main Street Greenville, S. C. 

High Standartls — Moderate Prices 
A Cordial WeUome 



REID & SWITZER 

Tailoring 

Trade in your old suit on a new Nash suit 

Representinjr the A. NASH COMPANY 

One Price— $23.50 

LATRENS, S. C. 



Page Two Hundred Fifty-two 



ti 



1930 



OE 



880 











JONES-TAYLOR HARDWARE CO. 

Incorporated 

Hardware, Agricultural Implements, Mill Supplies, B. P. S. 
Paints, Oils, Varnishes, Sporting Goods, Eet. 

LAURENS, S. C. 
















Our Aims 

Good Food Courtesy, Rea- 
sonable Prices 

We Serve Good Food and Deserve 
Your Patronage 

Savoy Cafe 

M. J. Herelis. Manager 

1327 Main St. Phone 6209 

Columbia, S. C. 




WHEN IN Sl'AItTANBlKC Vlsrf 

The Elite 

lUl K. Main St. 
AND 

La Petite Elite 

4U0 E. Main St. 
Two outstanding; establishments caterin:^ 

to students. 
Best Foods & Sodas — Nunnallys Candies 

Biltmore Ice Cream 
llil K, .Main St. Cor. Oakland & Main 
















Buchanan's Dry Cleaners and Steam Laundry 

Office Plione 2S Laimdiv I'liuiii' L'H 

CLINTON, S. C. 












Store 1442 Main St Green House: College Place 

"Flowers That Last" 
TELEPHONES Q* S. B. PARLER, 

Day 4620 (ZlSOTl^ Proprietor 
Night 4621 Member F. T. D. 
Florists and Decorators 

Established 1890 

"Say It With Flowers" 











ti 



1930 



Oe 



Page Two Hundred Fifty-three 



880 



The Preacher Is The Product Of 
The Seminary 

A strong Faculty means a strong Seminary 
OUR FACULTY: 

DR. GILLESPIE, President 

DR. McPHEETERS, Old Testament 

DR. CLARK, English Bible 

DR. KERR, Hebrew 

DR. GREEN, Theology 

DR. ROBINSON, History 

DR. BLAKELY, New Testament 

MR. ALSTON, Greek 

MR. GRAFTON, Bible 

Cohiiiihia Theological Seminary 

IN ATLANTA NEW EQUIPMENT COMPLETE COURSE 
DECATUR, GA. 



Patronize Our 
ADVERTISERS 



Page Two Hundred Fijiy-jour 



ti 



1930 



ft 



880 



A GOOD PLACE TO TRADE 

Hats — Gfents' Fiu-uishings — Shoes 

Tailor-made Clothing and 

Athletic Goods 



L. B. DILLARD 



Masonic Buildiuo; 



Clinton, Soutli Carolina 



H. D. HENRY, President 



F. M. BOLAND, Cashier 



THE COMMERCIAL BANK 

Phone 121 
The Bank of Personal Service 
Capital and Surplus, $75,000.00 



CASINO THEATRE 

WESTERN ELECTRIC SOUND SYSTEM 

The Best Is None Too Good For 
Our Patrons 

And Your Patronage Is Appreciated At All Times 

0. I. SHEELY, Manager 



193 




Page Two Hundred Fijty-fi.i'>' 



880 





A. M. T,aw & Co. 

Established 1892 

Insurance — Investment 
SPARTANBURG, S. C. 




E. L. Lillewood & Son 

Hospital for Shoes 
We solicit your patronage. 




Work called for and 
D.divcr.-a 




Greenville's Flower 
Shoppe 

204 N. Main St. 
GREENVILLE, S. C. 

Say tJ uith flowers on 




We Continually Improve — 
Better Today Than Ever 

The Ottaray Hotel 

J. Mason Ah-xauiler, Mgr. 






all occasions 










H. B. Harper & Bro. 




We are exclusive agents in Green- 
ville for Edwin-t'lapp, Arch-pre- 
server, Niinn Bush, WalkOver 
and Friendly Five shoes for men. 






Office Machineb 




If'e Would Appreciate Your Business 

Patton Tillman & 






GREENVILLE ANDERSON 




Bruce 

GREENVILLE, S. C. 






Paint.s,Glass,Roofinji-. Sand 
Biiililinu- Supplies 




Coggins & Johnson 

i:')Oll Main St. Coluniliia, S. V. 






William M. Bird & Co. 

IXCORPORATEI) 

CHARLESTON, S. C. 
Estalilislicil 1865 




Two Pants Suits At 
$25 $35 $45 

Made by STYLEPLUS 















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-* 






We are Outfitters for Everybody and W ant Your Business 






Clothing, Shoes, Hats, Dress Goods, 
Ready -to Wear and Furnishings 






COPELAND-STONE COMPANY 






"One Price to Air 
Phone 47 -:- CLINTON, S. C. 






Mens and Young Men's 






SUITS AND FURNISHINGS 






MINTERS 






LAURENS, S. C. 






Compliments 

Metropolitan Cafe 




The Toastee 
Sandwich Shop 

"A place to eat that's dilYereiU"" 






"The Old Reliable" 

1544 Main Street 

Columl)ia, S. C. 




Sandwiches Regular meals 
A LA CARTE SERVICE 

American Owned and American 

Operated 

ir.06 iMain Street Phone TUfi 

COLUMBIA. S. C. 






Showing at all times the individ- 
ual and exclusive in Ready-to- 
Wear and Millinery. 




Compliments 
of 






You have a special invitation to 
visit our i)lace. 




Belk-Rohinson 






Moore-Wilson Co. 

AMIEKSON. S ( . 




Company 

CHARLESTON, S. C. 















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Gallowav-McMillan Book Store 

BOOKS :-: MAGAZINES :-: STATIOXERY 
Conklins Pens and Cards For All Seasons 

College Boys Welcome and Your Trade Appreciated 
CLINTON, S. C. 












Compliments 
of 

MARMAC HOTEL 

F. D. McNulty, Jr., Manager 
COLUMBIA, SOUTH CAROLINA 












THE L. G. BALFOUR COMPANY 

ATTLEBORO, MASSACHUSETTS 

Manufacturers of 

Badges Fraternity Jewelry Medals 
Rings ]\Iemorial Tablets Cups 
Favors Emblem Insigina Trophies 
Programs Athletic Figures IMedallions 
Stationery Door Plates Plaques 

known Wherever There Are Schools and Colleges 











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S. M. and E. H. WILKES & CO. ^ 

CLINTON AND LAURENS 
Better Furniture for the Home 



Compliments 
of 

STETSON "D" TAILORS 

AND 

TONY'S SHOP 



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Equiijped with many years' exiierience for 






making Pliotograijli.s uf all ^orts, desirale 






for illustrating College Annuals. Best ob- 


! 




tainable artists, workmanship, and the ca- 






pacity for prompt and unequalled service. 


1 




<$><$><$> 






WHITE STUDIO 






Photographers to 






THE PAC SAC 






<s> <?■ <$> 


1 




/ 






Address Bequests for Information 






to Our 






EXECUTIVE OFFICE 






220 West 42iul Street 






NEW YORK 


1 






i 



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Page Two Hundred Sixty 



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Presbyterian College 

'Where Men Are Made" 
CLINTON, S. C. 



■^ •*> <5> 

The Standard Liberal Arts College for Men of the 
Synods of South Carolina and Georgia. 

Courses leading to A.B. and B.S. Degrees. 

Pre-professional courses featured. 

Comfortable Dormitories — Unexcelled Dining Hall 
Modern laboratory epuipinent. 

Comjilete range of (^mpus and collegiate social, lit- 
erary and athletic activities. 

Where every man has full opportunity for individual 
develoi^ment. 

Enrollment limited to three hundred students. 
JOHN McSWEEN, President 



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THE COUNTRY MARKET 




FRESH MEATS :-: OYSTERS :-: 


FISH 


WE TRIM OUR MEATS 




but 




Not Our Customers 




Phone 98 :- : Clinton, £ 


,. c. 



FIRST NATIONAL BANK 

OF CLINTON, S. C. 

Capital $100,000.00 

Surplus 50,000.00 



B. H. BOYD, President 

GEO. W. COPELAND, Viee-Pres., and Cashier 

L. D. MeCEABY, Disconnt Clerk 

.TOE L. DAVIDSON", Asst. Cashier 

MBS. S. L. PITTS, Stenographer 



We Will Appreciate Your Deposits 



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POINSETT HOTEL 

Carolina's Finest 
GREENVILLE, S. C. 



200 Eooms 



200 Baths 



Excellent Coiisine 

Barrainger Operated 
P. L. Kohlhammer, Manager 



UNIFORMS 

OF ALL DESCRIPTIONS 

Sigiiiiind Eisner Company 

BED BANK, N. J. 



Outfitter For R.O.T.C. Unit 
Presbyterian College 



li 



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Page Two Hundred Sixty-three 



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Eat Newberry Maid Butter 

and help rebuild agriculture in South Carolina 

MANUFACTURED BY 

NEWBERRY CREAMERY 

NEWBERRY, S. C. 
Highest market price paid for your cream 












THE MEN'S SHOP, Inc. 

LAURENS, S. C. 

<$> ^ ^ 

Quality Merchandise for Men 
and Young Men 












We cater to tlie BEST DRESSED COLLEGE 
TRADE in this state. 

Visit our COLLEGE DEPARTMENT or order 
liy mail. 

HOPE-DAVIS CO. 

COLUMBIA, H. C. 











I'agv Till) lliinilrvd Sixty-jour 



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BALDWIN'S GROCERY 

FANCY GROCERIES and FRESH MEATS 

Home of Good Things to Eat 

Phone 99 or 100 

CLINTON, SOUTH CAROLINA 



SUMTER MUSIC HOUSE 

(Horace B. Curtis, Prop.) 

Quality — Service — Price 
RADIOS — VICTROLAS — PIANOS 

136 North Main Street 
SUMTER, SOUTH CAROLINA 



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BLAKELY BROS. CO. 

NUNN-BUSH and FEEEMAN SHOES 
WEAR-PLUS SOCKS 

C'liiituu. South Carolina 












CLINTON MOTOR COMPANY 

Sales Service 

Clinton, Sontli Carolina 












We art' friends of Presbyterian College. 

Make our store your headquarters while in Chester. 

A cordial welcome awaits all college boys. 

CHESTER DRUG COMPANY 

"The Rexall Store" 
{'HESTEK, S C. 











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CHARLES WILLIAM FANT 

Architect 

Successor to Casey & Faiit 
ANDERSON, S. C. 



THOMASON MOTOR COMPANY 

LAUKEXS, SOUTH CAROLINA 
For the ullintale in riiling satisfaclion nolhing exceeds 

Buick and Marquette Cars 





For 


Best EATS Visit 










CLINTON CAFE 








Better 


Cooking 


— Snappy Service — 


Sanitary 






Phone 9267 






CLINTON, 


S. 


C. 



"THE MEN'S SHOP" 

Headquarters for Style 

CLOTHING, SHOES, and FURNISHINGS 

CLINTON, SOUTH CAROLINA 



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Page Tuo Hundred Si\t\-srvf'i 



880 















H A. Llndfors G. A. Lindfors 










Eau Claire Greenhouse 




LEAGUE'S 

Music House 






Cut Flowers and Corsages 

DESIGNS OF ALL KINDS 




G. Heyward Ashemore 






Day Phone 4289 3820 Main St. 
COLX'MBIA, S. C. 




225 N. Main St. 
GREENVILLE, S. C. 






Established Orer 45 Years 




Soda, Cigars, Whitman's 






P. H. Lachicotte & Co. 




Candies, Eastman Kodaks 
and 






Jewelers 




Kodak Supplies 






1424 Main St., COLUMBIA, S. 0. 




Bolt's Drug Store 






Watch and Jewelry Repairs 




GREENVILLE, S. C. 






Palmetto Music Co. 




Wilfred Cafeteria 






1643 Main Street 




The Sign of Good Food 






COLUMBIA, S. C. 




18 X. Main Street 






\Vm. C. Brysiin Phone 413LI 




GREEXVILLE, S. C. 






WHEN IX COLUMBIA 




Evei'v service that a Good 






stop at the 




Drug Store ought to render 
is tlie principh^ tliat is win- 






DESOTO HOTEL 




ning us new friends all 






Such popularity tnust 




the time. 






be deserved. 




Standard Pharmacy 






Ch.\s. E. New, Mgr. 




CHESTER, S. C. 












1 



fage Tun IliindreJ Sixty-eight 



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X-i I— r 



M^ 









IjOhere the oModern honors the cAncieuP-^ 

Books designed in the harmony of Grecian symmetry, 
printed with the richness of Gutenberg, bound in the 
finest leather of Cordova, have been preserved in the 
Castles of the Xobility to give us the inspiration of work 
in the spirit of their creation. 

And now when this book is preserved in your castle, 
when it exudes the warmth of friendly associations, when 
it reflects your personality in modern tempo; remember 
its creation has arisen in the spirit of our heritage, 
changed only in production methods — methods which are 
fully abreast of the time, modern in their entirety, unified 
in their completeness: allowing us to design the theme, 
engrave all plates, print and bind your annual as a 
continuous operation. — a ivork of modern craftsmenship. 

WE ARE PROUD OF YOUR APPRECIATION 
OF OUR SERVICE. 



Jacobs C^ Company 

Qlinton, South (Carolina 



COMMERCIAL ARTISTS 

PHOTO ExMGRAVERS 



ELECTROTYPERS 



PRINTERS 



880 















'■The House of Quality" 










The 




When von bovs are in Laur- 






R. L. Bryan Co. 




ens please make yonr head- 






1440 Main Street 




qnarters with us and give us 






COLUMBIA, S. C. 




what business vou liave while 






Printing, Binding, Ruling, 










Engraving, and Steel 




in onr town. 






Die Embossing 










OFFICE FURNITURE 




<» <S> ^ 






and SUPPLIES 










Books, Stationery, Fountain Pens, 










Eversharp Pencils, Pennants, 




Powe Drug Co. 






Pillow Tops, Kodaks and 




c? 






Films 










Everything The Student Needs 










Piu'niture, 




MANHATTAN STETSON 
SHIRTS HATS 






Floor Coverings, 




JESSAMINE CLOTHES 

$22.50 OJIS pair pants. 






Stoves, Etc. 




$6.00 — e.xtra pants. 
— the flower of manufacturing effort. 






fFe appreciate the patronage of 




KUPPENHEIMER 






the College, the Clubs, the So- 




GOOD CLOTHES 






cieties, the Professors and all 




— ( $40 to $65 )— 






connected with the College. 




We Specialize on Extra $'5ci 
Good Suits— 2 Pair Pants OD 














<S> ^ 










Prather- Simpson 




COPELAND CO. 

1535 MAIN ST. 






Furniture Co. 




COLUMBIA, S. C. 

HUADLEY CHENEY 






CLINTON, S. C. 




SWKATKRS CRAVATS 















Page Tiiu lliindfil .'^evenly 



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1930 



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THE NEW SHOE HOSPITAL 

S. D. DAWKINS, Mgr. 

WE MAKE YOUR SHOES LOOK LIKE NEW 

West Pitts St, CLINTON, S. C. 












South Carolina Business College 

Better Business Training 

Think-Plan-Aet 

Individual Instruction 

GREENVILLE, S. C. 












FULLER GROCERY COMPANY 

Wholesale Groceries 
We are always glad to serve you 

Phone 80 or 76 CLINTON, S. C. 












ABRAM'S BARBER SHOP 

Prompt and Courteous Service — First Class 
Barber Work 

P. C. Men Always Welcome 

H. Y. ABRAMS, Proprietor 











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AUTOGRAPHS 



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AUTOGRAPHS 



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A RETROSPECT 



OiR WORK on the PaC SaC has ended. We sincerely 

hope that vou are well pleased with our efforts. We 
have endeavored to portrav the life on our campus and 

show the growth that has taken place in the last fifty 
years. If our book pleases you we shall feel well re- 
paid for our efforts, but if it does not. remember that 
we have done our best. 

The editor personallv wishes to thank his staff for 
the cooperation that has been given him. 

He also wishes to express his appreciation for the 
beautiful photographic work done by the White Studio. 
ar.d the excellent service rendered by the engravers and 
printers. Jacobs & Company. 



Page Two Hundred Seventy-four 



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^••3^' 



PRESBYTERIAN COLLEGE LIBRARY 








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.^SSi^iiiB.' 



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37R757^K 



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